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Best & worst states for women’s equality: Where does Colorado rank?

Author: Erin Prater - August 23, 2018 - Updated: August 23, 2018

CS-WomensMarch2017.jpg
In this file photo from Jan. 21, 2017, protesters march down Tejon Street during the Colorado Springs Women's March in downtown Colorado Springs. The sister march of the Women's March on Washington, D.C., drew between 5,000 and 10,000 people. (File Photo by Christian Murdock/The Gazette)In this file photo from 2017, protesters march down Tejon Street during the Colorado Springs Women’s March in downtown Colorado Springs. The sister march of the Women’s March on Washington, D.C., drew between 5,000 and 10,000 people. (File Photo by Christian Murdock/The Gazette)

Just how female-friendly is Colorado?

Perhaps not exceedingly so.

With Women’s Equality Day on the horizon — this Sunday, in fact — the folks at perpetual best/worst list generator WalletHub compared the 50 U.S. states on “16 key indicators of gender equality,” including the gap between male and female executives, and the disparity in male and female unemployment rates.

Just where did we rank?

Pretty middle of the road — 23rd, to be precise.

On that note, Colorado also failed to rank in the top five best or worst states in the following categories: income gap, executive positions gap and political representation gap.

When it comes to “political empowerment rank” — which looked at the disparity of men and women elected to state and national offices — Colorado comes in at 21st, directly ahead of Oregon and behind Indiana (and behind No. 10 California, for those who continually compare the two).

A relative bright spot in the report: Colorado came in at a semi-respectable 9th in “education and health rank,” which looked at gender disparity in advanced degree attainment, math test scores and how affordable it is to see a doctor. (Considering that Colorado consistently ranks as one of the leanest, healthiest U.S. states, this should come as no surprise.)

When it came to “workplace environment rank,” however, the results weren’t so rosy — Colorado came near the bottom, at 47th. (The rank looked at gender disparity in income, share of executive positions, unemployment, entrepreneurship, work hours and poverty, among other factors.)

Related: Report on Capitol’s culture of sexual harassment finds few cases are reported

You can view the full report here.

Comment below to weigh in: Is Colorado a great place for women to live and work, or not so much?

Erin Prater

Erin Prater

Erin Prater is Colorado Politics' digital editor. She is a multimedia journalist with 15 years of experience writing, editing and designing for newspapers, magazines, websites and publishing houses. Her previous positions include military reporter at The Gazette, general assignment reporter at The Huerfano County (Colo.) World, copy editor at David C. Cook publishing house and adjunct mass communication instructor at Pueblo Community College. Her bylines include The New York Times Upfront, The Argus Leader (Sioux Falls, S.D.), Military Spouse magazine and Omaha Magazine (Omaha, Neb.). Her syndicated bylines include The Denver Post, MSNBC.com, Military.com and wire services.