Election 2018GovernorHot Sheet

They said it at the Colorado Civic Barbecue

Authors: Mark Harden, Erin Prater - May 20, 2018 - Updated: May 24, 2018

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Republican Greg Lopez (foreground, left) and other candidates for Colorado governor are interviewed between debate sessions at the Colorado Civic Barbecque in Colorado Springs on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Mark Harden, Colorado Politics).

All eight major-party candidates for Colorado governor gathered Saturday at our Colorado Civic Barbecue event in Colorado Springs. Here are some of the more notable things they said.

  • Greg Lopez: “A sales tax increase (for transportation) is going to cripple and kill rural Colorado.”
  • Victor Mitchell, also on transportation: “We’re going to have to put the government on a diet. We’re going to have to learn to do more with less.”
  • Cary Kennedy, on the need for a statewide solution on transportation: “We’ve been held back for decades, and it is holding our state’s economy back.”
  • Mike Johnston, on his hopes of revising the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights: “We’ve been starving the state budget for 25 years.”
  • Doug Robinson, on President Donald Trump: “He’s getting things done for America and he’s making changes for Colorado.”
  • Walker Stapleton, on whether he would invite both his cousin, Jeb Bush, and President Donald Trump to campaign for him: “Why not? We need them all.”
  • Jared Polis, on Trump: He’s “a threat to the integrity of our Republic and a threat to the Colorado way of life.”
  • Donna Lynne, on general agreement among Democrats at the debate on most issues: “So far it’s been pretty dull.”
  • Lopez, on school shootings: “We’ve abandoned God. We need to talk about the importance of values. A governor can talk about the importance of life and the importance of the way we take care of each other.”
  • Robinson on school shootings: “We know the Democrats’ plan: They want to take our guns away.”
  • Mitchell on school shootings: He said he would “bring in FBI profilers, behavioral specialists and mental health professionals to figure out a way to stop these shootings from happening in the first place.”
  • Kennedy on school shootings: “My daughter’s high school was put on lockdown last spring. … It terrifies and breaks our hearts. We should not have to live in fear of sending our kids to school or to the movies.”
  • Lynne on school shootings: “This is not about guns. This is a public health epidemic that we have to address.”
  • Polis on school shootings: “I oppose arming teachers.”
  • Stapleton, on marijuana sales: “I want to deal with practical solutions on a regulatory basis.”
  • Kennedy, on losing the treasurer’s office to Stapleton in 2010: “You have to lose in order to learn how to win … I learned a lot in that campaign.”
  • Mitchell, on his business background: “I’ve never signed anything other than the front side of a paycheck.”
  • Johnston, on priorities: “Repeal the worst parts of TABOR, ban the death penalty, and get on a far more aggressive path to 100 percent renewable energy.”
  • Lopez, on “sanctuary cities” in Colorado: “This is the beginning of turning Colorado into the ugly twin sister of California.”
  • Stapleton, on education funding: “We’re trying to pour more water into the bucket, but we’re not fixing the three holes in the bottom of the bucket.”
  • Robinson, summing up: “I have a vision for Colorado being a fiscally responsible, family friendly … state. Put me into office and I will leave you that place.”
  • Lynne, summing up: “I’m a get-it-done girl.”
  • Polis, summing up: “I’m ready day 1 to battle for universal health care here in Colorado.”
  • Johnston, summing up: “It’s easy at this moment to look around the country … and say, wow, how did we get here? I think the more important question is, how do we get out of here?”

Mark Harden

Mark Harden

Mark Harden is managing editor of Colorado Politics. He previously was news director at the Denver Business Journal; city editor, online news editor, state editor, national editor and popular music critic at The Denver Post; and an editor and reporter at newspapers in the Seattle area and San Francisco.


Erin Prater

Erin Prater

Erin Prater is Colorado Politics' digital editor. She is a multimedia journalist with 15 years of experience writing, editing and designing for newspapers, magazines, websites and publishing houses. Her previous positions include military reporter at The Gazette, general assignment reporter at The Huerfano County (Colo.) World, copy editor at David C. Cook publishing house and adjunct mass communication instructor at Pueblo Community College. Her bylines include The New York Times Upfront, The Argus Leader (Sioux Falls, S.D.), Military Spouse magazine and Omaha Magazine (Omaha, Neb.). Her syndicated bylines include The Denver Post, MSNBC.com, Military.com and wire services.