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Miller HudsonMiller HudsonSeptember 24, 20187min308

Technology develops in accordance with an ethos and logic impervious to ideology. Politicians on both the right and left have been badly burned in recent years by staking policy positions presuming tomorrow will look a lot like today. Whatever you may believe about evolution in the biological realm, technology changes incrementally in response to the application of human ingenuity. This all came to mind as I listened to speakers at a workshop on Colorado’s energy resilience earlier this week at the law offices of Faegre and Benson in Denver.


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Ray ScottRay ScottSeptember 20, 20186min990

When the Colorado Public Utilities Commission recently approved Xcel Energy’s Colorado Energy Plan, the commissioners made a highly politicized decision that ignored economic reality, bypassed the state legislature and allowed the company to break its promise to save customers money. Coloradans should be troubled not just by the plan itself, but by how it won approval through an end-run of the democratic process.


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Julie GorteJulie GorteAugust 16, 20186min1590

Colorado’s largest electric utility, Xcel Energy, has a plan to dramatically shift the way we produce energy by increasing the amount of renewable energy produced right here in the Centennial State. Doing so would deliver substantial economic and environmental benefits to Colorado residents in the form of new jobs, increased revenue for communities, and lower utility bills for both businesses and consumers.


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Amy Oliver CookeAmy Oliver CookeAugust 2, 20187min3421

Late last summer, and with great fanfare, Xcel Energy announced its proposal to close the Comanche I & II power units in Pueblo a decade ahead of schedule. They offered as replacement the euphemistically titled “Colorado Energy Plan” (CEP), a massive $2.5 billion fuel-switching scheme to move its Colorado customers away from baseload, reliable hydrocarbons in favor of intermittent renewables, predominantly industrial wind.