amy-oliver-cooke.jpg

Amy Oliver CookeAmy Oliver CookeAugust 2, 20187min3289

Late last summer, and with great fanfare, Xcel Energy announced its proposal to close the Comanche I & II power units in Pueblo a decade ahead of schedule. They offered as replacement the euphemistically titled “Colorado Energy Plan” (CEP), a massive $2.5 billion fuel-switching scheme to move its Colorado customers away from baseload, reliable hydrocarbons in favor of intermittent renewables, predominantly industrial wind.



Marianne GoodlandMarianne GoodlandNovember 21, 201713min567
Cotton is the symbol for the second anniversary: According to one website, cotton is both a symbol of increasing strength and an ability to adapt. That seems an appropriate way to describe Colorado’s water plan, which this week hit its second anniversary. The plan, under the oversight of the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB), is […]

This content is only available to subscribers.

Login or Subscribe


Screen-Shot-2017-09-19-at-8.43.00-PM.jpg

Joey BunchJoey BunchSeptember 20, 20174min1206

Boulder-based Western Resource Advocates and Denver-based Conservation Colorado are releasing a report Wednesday that analyzes policies the legislature and state agencies could adopt to reduce carbon pollution and help fight off climate change.

The document backs goals set by Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper in his July executive order on climate change.

The report shows asks current and future legislators to:

  • Adopt a statewide goal to reduce carbon pollution by at least 45 percent below 2005 levels by 2030, and by 90 percent by 2050. (Hickenlooper’s order set a goal of a 26 percent reduction by 2025, “but we must build on that by establishing pollution limits for 2030 and 2050,” the two environmental groups said in a joint statement.)
  • Advance policies that reduce carbon pollution in electricity, transportation, industrial, commercial and other sectors.
  • Enact a market-based cap on carbon pollution. The groups cited a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade program as possibilities.

The full report should be  available on both organizations’ websites today.

While interesting goals, the proposals have little chance of getting through the current legislature. Democrats hold a solid House majority, a nine-seat edge in the 65-member chamber, but Republicans control the Senate, 18-17. The statehouse GOP won’t budge on their support for oil and gas production. They look upon such recommendations from the left with extreme skepticism.

Next year, however, is an election that should shift the balance of power, potentially putting a Republican in the governor’s office, or Democrats could take the majority in the Senate.

Climate-change activists point to the high stakes.

”Climate change is already causing more severe wildfires, droughts, flooding and other harm to our communities and current carbon pollution reduction plans are not enough to avoid even more severe impacts in the future,” Jon Goldin Dubois, president of Western Resource Advocates, said in a statement. “Our state, businesses, local governments, and communities need to get behind comprehensive statewide action on climate change to reduce carbon pollution by 45 percent by 2030 and to ensure a healthy and resilient economy.”

Pete Maysmith, the executive director of Conservation Colorado, the state’s largest environmental organization, said the report offers a path forward on climate change.

“Gov. Hickenlooper’s important actions on climate change this summer set us on the right path, and now we need to embrace the challenge and implement specific policies that grow our clean energy economy and defend against the impact of climate change that we’re already feeling in our state.”

Here is the governor’s executive order on climate change.


iStock-176023253-1024x693.jpg

Joey BunchJoey BunchSeptember 16, 20178min477
Opposite of leadership is blaming bill drafters for your own bad legislation, then wasting even more taxpayer dollars. #copolitics #coleg — Rep. Patrick Neville (@PatrickForCO) September 15, 2017 Leveraging a drafting error no one saw & that has bad effects for ppl is cynical politics that ppl hate. Quit it GOP. #coleg #copolitics — KC […]

This content is only available to subscribers.

Login or Subscribe



Ernest LuningErnest LuningJuly 11, 20179min1463

Gov. John Hickenlooper on Tuesday signed an executive order committing Colorado to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in accordance with a global climate agreement rejected last month by President Donald Trump. Hickenlooper said the state is joining the U.S. Climate Alliance, a coalition of 13 states and Puerto Rico committed to adhering to the goals set by the Paris climate accord.


2fb33bbdf81ab8da8d34f280ea2373d4.jpg

Joey BunchJoey BunchJuly 3, 20173min225
U.S. Rep. Doug Lamborn of Colorado Springs says hydropower generated from water pumped back uphill and released again is the wave of the future for clean energy in the West. His bill, the Bureau of Reclamation Pumped Storage Hydropower Development Act, cleared the U.S. House on a voice vote last week. If it passes the Senate, […]

This content is only available to subscribers.

Login or Subscribe



Joey BunchJoey BunchFebruary 1, 20172min264
In a Colorado College poll released Tuesday, Mountain West voters were more than three times as likely to pick protecting water, air, critters and recreation on federal public lands than drilling and mining. The Colorado Springs college’s State of the Rockies Project released its seventh annual Conservation in the West poll of voters in Arizona, Colorado, Montana, […]

This content is only available to subscribers.

Login or Subscribe


AP16300532363625-e1478548932236.jpg

Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinNovember 7, 20167min899

Colorado public interest, environmental and public health organizations have called upon the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment to use funds from the Volkswagen emissions cheating scandal to support a transition to a zero-emission transportation future. At issue is $61.3 million Colorado will receive between 2017 and 2027 from a settlement between the U.S. Department of Justice and Volkswagen related to the company’s violation of emission control laws in more than half a million vehicles.