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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirMarch 26, 201818min863

For once, Dick Wadhams had a wound that wasn't inflicted by his adversaries. The legendary Republican political strategist, two-time Colorado GOP state chair, decades-long veteran of campaign combat and, when needed, bare-knuckled brawler was taking his usual walk along a lake near his house the other day when he slipped on some ice. He fell and broke his arm.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningFebruary 18, 201816min1166

THEY GRABBED A CLIPBOARD ... It looks like a lot of Coloradans took the advice of a certain soon-to-be-former president. In his farewell address, delivered just over a week before leaving office, President Barack Obama said an oft-quoted line — "If you're disappointed by your elected officials, grab a clipboard, get some signatures, and run for office yourself" — that might have launched a thousand candidacies, including quite a few here in Colorado.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningAugust 7, 201712min2824

Will voters care if Democratic congressional candidate Jason Crow represented some unsavory characters early in his career as an attorney? It’s a serious vulnerability, says one of his primary opponents, and a veteran Republican strategist who won two statewide races in Colorado thanks to similar attacks on another Democrat agrees. Crow’s campaign team, however, says his background and experience will only serve to strengthen his bid to unseat Republican Mike Coffman, a five-term incumbent.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningApril 6, 201723min724

Dick Wadhams, who chaired the state Republican Party for two terms and had a hand in electing the statewide officials who set the tone for the Colorado GOP across three decades, has a message for the party: Republicans have never had it easy in Colorado. “This has always been a competitive state; this has never been a Republican bastion,” he told the monthly meeting of the Highlands Ranch Republicans early last Friday morning.


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightJanuary 19, 201712min300

… Twenty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … Coloradans were in a proud position. The state's very own were to head both of the nation's major political parties … Gov. Roy Romer acknowledged that his new post as general chairman of the Democratic National Committee — yes, while still governor — would make a 1998 run for U.S. Senate “less likely.” Romer admitted that it would be impossible “to wear three hats” — governor, DNC general chair, and U.S. Senate candidate, but also said he had not made a final decision whether to run or not. During a press conference to discuss his surprise ascension to the DNC post, the governor said that President Bill Clinton had called him the day before the legislative session began, asking him to resign the governorship.


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightJanuary 5, 201713min343

Twenty Years Ago This Week in The Colorado Statesman … The Colorado Supreme Court had been mulling over the Legislature's gambling restrictions for elected officials passed six years earlier. The Colorado Supreme Court in a unanimous decision, declared constitutional a law prohibiting elected, municipal officials of Central City, Black Hawk and Cripple Creek as well as county commissioners of Teller and Gilpin Counties from holding a direct or indirect interest in a limited gaming license. The Legislature had formulated the idea and gotten Gov. Roy Romer to sign off on it in May 1991 as part of the Colorado Limited Gaming Act, which had been spawned by the voters' desire to extend and expand gambling in the Colorado gaming towns under Amendment 50. The Legislature's measure then winded its way through the judiciary, taking over five-and-a-half years to reach the Colorado Supreme Court.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinDecember 12, 20165min669

Former Colorado legislator Greg Brophy has joined the Denver office of Michael Best Strategies, LLC, as western region vice-president. Michael Best Strategies is the lobbying and regulatory-consulting arm of law firm Michael Best & Friedrich, LLP. The ex-state representative and senator will focus on facilitating communications between regionally-based U.S. companies and organizations and the federal government in Washington, D.C., through collaboration with Michael Best Strategies’ teams in the nation’s capital.