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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirDecember 24, 201714min1036

For a relatively young man who went so far so fast in Colorado politics — and who developed such a high profile by the time he left office — Terrance Carroll has an almost astonishing answer when asked if he ever intends to get back in the ring. You'll have to read on to find out what he told us, but here's a hint: When asked for his bucket list, the former Colorado House speaker and Denver Democrat — a practicing attorney at a national law firm, ordained minister and champion of educational choice — says he thinks about writing a book. For at-risk kids.


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Jessica MachettaDecember 4, 20174min1239
A record number of people are moving out of Colorado, according  to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau. About 193,000 Colorado residents moved to other states last year, 10,000 more than in 2015. Where are they moving to? According to the data, the biggest percentage of them headed for Washington state, with other destinations being […]

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Erica WernerErica WernerApril 6, 20179min485

The vote was 55-45, short of the 60 needed to advance Gorsuch over procedural hurdles to a final vote. All 44 Democrats and independents voted against advancing Gorsuch, and for procedural reasons, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell cast his vote with them to enable the vote to be reconsidered. Many senators voted from their seats, a rare and theatrical occurrence, then stayed in the chamber for the drama yet to unfold.


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Dan ElliottDan ElliottApril 4, 201710min395

Economic damage from a Colorado mine waste spill caused by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency might be far less than originally feared after attorneys drastically reduced some of the larger claims, The Associated Press has learned. Farmers, business owners, residents and others initially said they suffered $1.2 billion in lost income, property damage and personal injuries from the 2015 spill at the Gold King Mine, which tainted rivers in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah.


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Mary Clare JalonickMary Clare JalonickApril 3, 20179min318

A deeply divided Senate panel favorably recommended Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch on Monday, sending the nomination to the full Senate for what is expected to be a partisan showdown — and eventual confirmation. The 11-9 committee vote for President Donald Trump's nominee, strictly along party lines, came shortly after Democrats secured enough votes to block the nomination in the full Senate. But that Democratic success was virtually certain to be a short-lived political victory, as Republicans vowed to change Senate rules to put Gorsuch on the court and score a much-needed win for their party.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinMarch 8, 20176min355

"The most significant and inspirational journey in history" was what U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter, D-CO7, called a provision in S. 442, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Transition Authorization Act of 2017. He wrote the measure, calling for a plan to successfully launch a human space flight mission to Mars by 2033. The U.S. House unanimously approved the measure Tuesday night, March 7, and the Senate did likewise on Feb. 17. It now goes to President Donald Trump for his signature. If signed, it would be the first NASA authorization bill to be adopted since 2010.