Roger-Hudson-Mug.jpg

Roger HudsonRoger HudsonJune 19, 20174min367

My phone lit up this weekend with news that a group of Republicans marching in Denver’s Pride Fest had been “attacked on the parade route by an angry group wearing masks.” One text described the attackers as cursing lesbians dressed all in black. Another text said that all was well and nothing appeared to be organized.


Cliff_May_02-high_res-e1455772348388.jpg

Clifford D. MayClifford D. MayJune 15, 20178min428

In the aftermath of the terrorist atrocities of Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush drew a line in the sand. “Every nation, in every region, now has a decision to make,” he announced. “Either you are with us or you are with the terrorists.” Since then, disappointingly if not surprisingly, more than a few nations have straddled that line, providing support to America and America’s enemies alike. Is that because they sympathize with the goals of the terrorists or because they’re afraid of the terrorists or is there some other explanation? It’s not clear. What is: No nation has hedged its bets more egregiously than Qatar.


OP-Scott_Tipton_W.jpg

Scott TiptonScott TiptonMay 29, 20174min451

As a member of Congress, I have the unique opportunity to visit the memorials dedicated to fallen service members that are just a short distance from the Capitol building. Across the Potomac River, Arlington National Cemetery serves as the final resting place for hundreds of thousands of men and women who served in the armed services. Each day I work in Washington, I am reminded that the privilege we have of living in a free society has been paid by so many who have selflessly sacrificed their lives in service to their country. Memorial Day offers an important opportunity for us to reflect and pay our respects to those who have given all.


AP17149596374699-e1496084668797.jpg

Darlene SupervilleDarlene SupervilleMay 29, 20176min644

President Donald Trump expressed his nation's "boundless and undying" gratitude Monday to Americans who have fallen in battle and to the families they left behind, hailing as heroes the hundreds of thousands buried at Arlington National Cemetery, including a soldier from Colorado Springs. In his first Memorial Day remarks as president, Trump told the stories of two soldiers who died in Afghanistan, Green Beret Capt. Andrew D. Byers of Colorado Springs and Christopher D. Horton of the Oklahoma National Guard, as Byers' parents and Horton's widow looked on.