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Joey BunchJoey BunchFebruary 18, 20183min3589

Veteran pollster Floyd Ciruli says Colorado’s political landscape that’s evolving, and Thursday he will moderate a panel that will tell us where it’s headed.

The program, “Colorado Politics in 2018: Transition in the Age of Polarization,” is from 4 to 6 p.m., followed by a reception, in Room 1150 at the Sié Center at 2201 S. Gaylord St. at the University of Denver.

Ciruli is the director of the Crossley Center, as well as a columnist for Colorado Politics.

The panel will include:

  • Dick Wadhams, a former state Republican Party chairman and renowned political campaign manager and senior staffer for such leaders as former Gov. Bill Owens and the late Bill Armstrong, a U.S. senator from Colorado.
  • Steve Welchert, a Democratic consultant for such as leaders as Mayor Federico Peña and U.S. Ed Perlmutter, as well as a raft of Colorado ballot issues.
  • Melanie Layton and Zoey DeWolf, lobbyists for the firm Colorado Legislative Services.
  • Vincent Carroll, former editorial page editor for the Rocky Mountain News and Denver Post.

Admission is free, but space is limited, so those who plan to attend should RSVP to Jane Bucher-McCoy at jane.bucher-mccoy@du.edu or 303-871-2882.

“Colorado is in a major political transition,” Ciruli tells Colorado Politics. “A Democratic governor with both houses of the legislature under Democratic control could revive the 2013 lurch to the left. On the other hand, a Republican governor with even one house of the legislature could move the state to the right.”

He said DeWolf and Layton will point out and size up key legislative races — Democrats hold a nine-seat edge in the House, but Republicans have only a one-seat majority in the state Senate.

Wadhams and Welchert will talk about the partisan political temperature, while Carroll gives a media overview.

Panel is cosponsored by Crossley Center for Public Opinion Research and Institute for Public Policy Studies at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver.


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