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Peter MarcusPeter MarcusAugust 9, 20176min237
State leaders on Wednesday will advocate for protecting undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children. U.S. Rep. Jared Polis, D-Boulder; Lt. Gov. Donna Lynne, a Democrat; and Denver Mayor Michael Hancock are among officials who will speak at the event, along with members of the business, education and immigrant communities. The […]

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Peter MarcusPeter MarcusJune 16, 20173min347

Immigrant rights groups this week launched a telephone hotline with the goal of tracking potential federal immigration raids in local communities.

The Colorado Rapid Response Network is staffed with more than 100 volunteers trained to track, verify and confirm ICE raids in immigrant communities, according to Mi Familia Vota, a national group that advocates for Latinos and immigrants.

The Trump administration has so far signaled that it will keep in place Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, which protects undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

But fears continue to swell in immigrant communities over a potential federal crackdown of undocumented immigrants who were not brought to the United States as children.

“On this DACA anniversary I am reminded of the power and resilience of our community, which through constant pressure was able to win DACA for so many people, including me,” said Ana Rodriguez, a DACA recipient and organizer for Colorado People’s Alliance.

“However, in these dangerous times, we must continue to use our power to fight for and protect our parents, friends and neighbors who don’t have the protection that DACA extends.”

Saying that immigrants are “under attack,” groups behind the Colorado Rapid Response Network hope to document “increasingly violent” activity by federal immigration enforcers, though there have been no examples yet in Colorado of any mass federal roundups.

“While I might not be able to show up during a reported incident, I know as a DACAmented person, I have a role in deportation resistance,” Rodriguez said.

The program will help immigrants with legal guidance to “resist ICE civil rights abuses in Colorado.”

The effort is supported by a 24-hour hotline, 1-844-UNITE-41 (1-844-864-8341).

Those who are trained and will staff the hotline will document ICE activities and support families in determining the right course of action during a potential ICE encounter.

“This effort is a way to provide a trusted foundation in fighting the out-of-control federal immigration enforcement apparatus and to stop the spread of misinformation in immigrant communities in light of the fear brought on by xenophobic rhetoric,” read a press release from the groups launching the initiative.

“Information is power, and knowing what to do during times of uncertainty could be the key to keeping our families together,” said Carla Castedo, state director for Mi Familia Vota. “The intention of having this network is to ease the fear in the community by being able to confirm and/or deny activity that is conducted by ICE.”



Joey BunchJoey BunchApril 11, 20177min262
A Colorado Senate Committee had partisan rulings on two bills about cooperating with the Trump administration on enforcing federal immigration laws Monday. The Judiciary Committee voted along party lines to pass Senate Bill 281 to allow crime victims to sue taxpayers in so-called sanctuary cities, where law enforcement doesn’t “turn over” undocumented residents to federal Immigration and […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchFebruary 6, 20175min238
If you’re going to make a political statement, make it loudly. State Rep. Dave Williams’ House Bill 1134 to hold elected leaders liable in civil and criminal courts for crimes committed by undocumented residents is attracting a choir from other states. Alaska State Rep. David Eastman, Ohio State Rep. Candice Keller and Maine State Rep. Lawrence Lockman […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchJanuary 31, 20174min317
Republican state Rep. Dave Williams of Colorado Springs wants to open up civil and criminal court for sanctuary city leaders “who care more about illegal aliens than protecting the people they are supposed to serve.” If an undocumented immigrant does harm because of weak government policies, a victim could sue or some investigatory agency might […]

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John TomasicJohn TomasicJanuary 30, 20175min422

State Rep. Joe Salazar, a Thornton Democrat, said the explosive Trump White House — which has taken even Republican members of Congress and Trump cabinet appointees <a href="http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-trump-gop-whiplash-20170130-story.html?ncid=newsltushpmgnews" target="_blank">by surprise</a> in the ten days since inauguration — is affecting the mood at the Capitol in Denver. “I can say it has changed conversations,” he told the Colorado Statesman on Monday. “My Republican colleagues have been very quiet about what’s happening with this administration.” Salazar added that he thought some of his GOP colleagues may be taking their cues from Washington. He singled out Rep. Dave Williams, a Republican lawmaker from Colorado Springs. “I’ve heard Rep. Williams is introducing a bill that would criminalize lawmakers — something to do with holding lawmakers criminally liable for any laws that might protect an undocumented person who caused harm to a Coloradan,” he said. “It’s utterly tone deaf coming from a freshman legislator.”