Tom RamstackTom RamstackSeptember 13, 20176min224
WASHINGTON — A congressional hearing Wednesday implied broad changes are coming soon for Colorado’s highway transportation industry from self-driving truck technologies. Driverless trucks are part of the automated vehicle technology being developed by government agencies and private companies. They use computerized sensors to steer, throttle and brake vehicles, usually without human intervention. Senators at the […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchApril 18, 20173min109
How mainstream is Colorado marijuana? Tuesday one of the state’s largest dispensaries, Native Roots Colorado, stood shoulder-to-shoulder with the Colorado State Patrol, Mothers Against Drunk Driving and Uber on a joint project. Rather than driving high on 4/20 — Thursday’s unofficial holiday for pot lovers — those celebrating in Denver can save $4.20 off their […]

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Sen. Owen HillSen. Owen HillMarch 27, 20175min840

Mornings are rough. Stop-and go-traffic on I-25 can feel more like a nauseating carnival ride than a highway. It’s no easier in the city. A car just ahead with out-of-state plates slams on its brakes and that cup of morning coffee flies through the air, staining your shirt. The car ahead is now attempting to parallel park, and doing a pretty poor job of it. The minutes tick by until traffic opens up enough to swerve angrily around the parallel parking pariah, narrowly avoiding a pedestrian who decided to walk diagonally across a busy downtown intersection. Arrive at work late, stained, smelling like dark roast and at peak levels of frustration. Time to start the day.


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Rep. Dan PabonRep. Dan PabonMarch 21, 20175min893

A few years ago, Colorado triggered a wave of innovation when it became the first state to update its laws so that ride-sharing digital platforms, Uber and Lyft, could continue to thrive while establishing proper safety and consumer protections. What we know now, two years after that effort, is that it was crucial for Colorado’s economy and lifestyle that our laws continue to keep pace with developments in modern commerce.


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John TomasicJohn TomasicMarch 13, 20176min960

State Sen. Owen Hill is not for letting the crisis of Colorado’s inadequate transportation go to waste. There won’t be any ski train coming any time soon. There may or may not be a transportation funding bill passed this legislative session or any legislative session. Coloradans are desperate. It’s past time to be bold, to color outside the lines! Hill told reporters Monday morning that he thinks Colorado could become a national workshop for the autonomous vehicle revolution. He said it’s worth getting out front of other states by moving now to put the fast-evolving technology to use on our roads and invite entrepreneurs and companies working the sector to set up shop here.



Peter MarcusPeter MarcusFebruary 10, 20178min54
If you were hoping to tune out politics by tuning into Super Bowl Sunday, then you turned to the wrong place. Viewers were bombarded by commercials seeking to capitalize on the civil unrest stemming from controversial and brash decisions by the Trump administration. The move by corporate America to weigh into the ongoing debates seemed […]

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Peter MarcusPeter MarcusJanuary 30, 201710min60
Uber and Lyft are accustomed to competition. But a new race toward good conscience — highlighted by protests in Denver — offers a glimpse into the morality battle in a Donald Trump era, a war that is reshaping both business and politics. Across social media, #DeleteUber is trending, a plea by those opposed to Trump’s Muslim ban […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchJanuary 24, 20173min105
Lawmakers could make it little easier to become an Uber or Lyft driver this session by passing Senate Bill 43. The legislation would eliminate a requirement for a certificate of good health for those driving their personal vehicles to get people around. The legislative term for that is transportation network company. The bill is blessed […]

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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinDecember 2, 20168min108

Close to 2,200 taxi, shuttle and limousine drivers will likely face fewer regulations in the New Year, when the City and County of Denver is expected to stop requiring them to qualify for and obtain “Herdic” licenses. Such licenses were named for the Herdic cab, a horse-drawn carriage invented by Peter Herdicin in 1881. Herdic cabs were designed as passenger vehicles for public transportation, often painted bright yellow, and were predecessors to the modern taxi cab. The Denver City Council's Business, Arts, Workforce and Aeronautical Services Committee, at its Wednesday, Nov. 30, meeting, sent an ordinance repealing the Herdic license portion of the municipal code to the full council for consideration. Once approved, the city attorney's office will drop an appeal to the Colorado Supreme Court of a state preemption ruling against the city regarding the rules and regulations.