Uber Archives - Colorado Politics
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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirFebruary 19, 201815min304
Jimmy Sengenberger was that way-older-than-his-years, way-ahead-of-the-pack kind of kid you sort of admired and sort of envied — and, admit it, sort of resented — back in middle school. He began listening to Rush on the radio at 12 and was attending Arapahoe County Republican Men’s Club breakfasts by 13. He was putting together high […]

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Parking is the second-largest revenue driver for Denver International Airport, but according to City Auditor Timothy O’Brien, lax oversight with Lyft and Uber could be letting money slip through the cracks. In a report released Thursday, O’Brien found the airport charges Lyft and Uber $2.60 for each pickup and drop off at DIA. But the […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchDecember 6, 20175min5810

Uber driver Casper Stockham ran for Congress and lost last year, but he hasn’t lost sight of a campaign promise to help build up Five Points around the families who settled there.

A first-timer, Stockham didn’t know enough about campaigning, how to get his message out and how to raise the millions of dollars in local and national support to knock off a well-financed incumbent, Diana DeGette, in a safely drawn Democratic district in Denver. Predictably, he got about 28 percent of the vote.

But there’s not much you can teach Stockham about the challenges of the inner city or question his devotion to helping solve them. He ran last year on the promise to help make Five Points great again, but great for the existing businesses and nearby neighborhoods that made it great the last time around, rather than pricing them out by catering to outside money and redevelopment.

I wasn’t surprised, then, to get a statement of his beliefs about the ink! coffee shop controversy and gentrification.

Stockham says there are solutions to allow gentrification balanced against opportunities to preserve and strengthen traditional neighborhoods. He said local officials and the government system have failed to do that.

“If the protesters win, we lose a viable business in the community. If the winds of gentrification win, we lose diverse communities that the city was built upon,” he said. “Gentrification without community opportunity has citizens at odds with the very same policies and political leaders they vote for year after year.

“Gentrification never affects healthy communities, so a healthy community should be the focus.”

He added, “We must address the problem, not the symptoms.”

Stockham said if he was governor — could he run? — he would release a five-point plan “that would provide real solutions to problems in the inner city and rural communities, like high unemployment, high crime, homelessness, sex trafficking and the lack of access to resources and prosperity.”

Here’s his plan:

  1. “Identify a community solutions director and staff.”
  2. “Identify organizations and resources that are already doing good work.”
  3. “Work with local community leaders who want to see real positive change.”
  4. “Create Empowerment Purpose Centers in the inner city and rural areas.”
  5. “Remove government red tape that would stop any of the above from happening.”

On his website, Stockham hints, “The 2018 gubernatorial race in Colorado is going to come down to big money on the left or right and we the people. We can choose the status quo and see very little to no change for the better or We The People can choose to move our state forward in a positive and beneficial way!”

To jump in the governor’s race at this point– with eight mostly better-known Republicans already in –would be futile, but nobody has ever accused Casper Stockham of being afraid of long odds. Good candidates who run and lose too often, however, have a hard time getting traction and money when the time is right.

An Air Force veteran, good speaker and an effortlessly likable person, Stockham has something to offer the public discourse from a working man’s conservative point of view. I ran into him at the Western Conservative Summit this summer and asked if he was thinking about any races a few notches down from Congress or perhaps in a district where a Republican has a sporting chance. He said he wouldn’t aim low, whatever he does next.

If he runs for something and makes promises, he wants to be able to deliver and make a real difference.



Tom RamstackTom RamstackSeptember 13, 20176min305
WASHINGTON — A congressional hearing Wednesday implied broad changes are coming soon for Colorado’s highway transportation industry from self-driving truck technologies. Driverless trucks are part of the automated vehicle technology being developed by government agencies and private companies. They use computerized sensors to steer, throttle and brake vehicles, usually without human intervention. Senators at the […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchApril 18, 20173min200
How mainstream is Colorado marijuana? Tuesday one of the state’s largest dispensaries, Native Roots Colorado, stood shoulder-to-shoulder with the Colorado State Patrol, Mothers Against Drunk Driving and Uber on a joint project. Rather than driving high on 4/20 — Thursday’s unofficial holiday for pot lovers — those celebrating in Denver can save $4.20 off their […]

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Sen. Owen HillSen. Owen HillMarch 27, 20175min2740

Mornings are rough. Stop-and go-traffic on I-25 can feel more like a nauseating carnival ride than a highway. It’s no easier in the city. A car just ahead with out-of-state plates slams on its brakes and that cup of morning coffee flies through the air, staining your shirt. The car ahead is now attempting to parallel park, and doing a pretty poor job of it. The minutes tick by until traffic opens up enough to swerve angrily around the parallel parking pariah, narrowly avoiding a pedestrian who decided to walk diagonally across a busy downtown intersection. Arrive at work late, stained, smelling like dark roast and at peak levels of frustration. Time to start the day.


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Rep. Dan PabonRep. Dan PabonMarch 21, 20175min2033

A few years ago, Colorado triggered a wave of innovation when it became the first state to update its laws so that ride-sharing digital platforms, Uber and Lyft, could continue to thrive while establishing proper safety and consumer protections. What we know now, two years after that effort, is that it was crucial for Colorado’s economy and lifestyle that our laws continue to keep pace with developments in modern commerce.


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John TomasicJohn TomasicMarch 13, 20176min2290

State Sen. Owen Hill is not for letting the crisis of Colorado’s inadequate transportation go to waste. There won’t be any ski train coming any time soon. There may or may not be a transportation funding bill passed this legislative session or any legislative session. Coloradans are desperate. It’s past time to be bold, to color outside the lines! Hill told reporters Monday morning that he thinks Colorado could become a national workshop for the autonomous vehicle revolution. He said it’s worth getting out front of other states by moving now to put the fast-evolving technology to use on our roads and invite entrepreneurs and companies working the sector to set up shop here.