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Colorado PoliticsColorado PoliticsSeptember 19, 20185min344

While we agree with Cory Gardner in recommending a cautious policy when dealing with Russia, we believe the Senator is using the current distrust between Russia and the US as cover to advance his real overriding agenda, promoting the fracked gas industry. After all, according to Ballotpedia.com, since 2009 Sen. Gardner has received at least $750K from the oil and gas industry in direct campaign contributions alone. As such, Gardner’s industry-serving “solutions" demand a more critical look.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirAugust 15, 20185min302

In a few short weeks, the nation will be watching closely as the U.S. Senate begins its confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, who has been tapped by President Trump as the replacement for Justice Anthony Kennedy. If confirmed to the highest court in the land, Kavanaugh would be tasked with immediately deciding what our Constitution means and how it will affect the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer Americans and their families.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirMarch 7, 20183min2443

No sooner had Hot Sheet taken note of Colorado Republican U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner’s feature-length profile by Politico this week — depicting him as a pol who can work both sides of the aisle while keeping the White House at bay — than Gardner’s own communications staff sent this press release over the transom:

Washington, DC – The Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) today announced Senator Cory Gardner (R-CO) has been awarded their Legislative Action Award. The awards are presented annually to members of Congress within their first six years in office who work to build consensus, elevate the tenor of the debate, practice civility, and advance legislation on pressing issues.

The organization’s president, Jason Grumet, was quoted:

“Senator Cory Gardner demonstrates the power of strong principles combined with a willingness to reach across the political aisle on issues of consequence to the nation. … On matters as diverse and important as immigration, cybersecurity, and the threat from North Korea, Senator Gardner’s primary focus has been on action and results. He is at once a proud member of his party and an effective legislator who places the interests of the country first.” 

Quite a tribute — and one of obvious value to Team Gardner these days. As noted in the Politico story on the senator published Monday, “Gardner is going to need bipartisan accomplishments to survive his own swing-state reelection race in 2020.”

And he certainly is a swing-state GOP senator who has felt the heat of near constant scrutiny, especially since Donald Trump’s upset victory in November 2016. Gardner’s every vote, policy position and public utterance are being dissected and analyzed in an attempt to label him “too extreme for Colorado” as his 2020 re-election bid approaches. So, a plaudit attesting to Gardner’s bipartisan bona fides couldn’t come at a better time.

The Bipartisan Policy Center is a centrist think tank in Washington, D.C., founded in 2007 by four former Senate majority leaders — two from each party: Republicans Howard Baker and Bob Dole, and Democrats Tom Daschle and George Mitchell.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirJanuary 18, 20184min487
Indivisible Denver members gather recently for a New Year’s rally in solidarity with immigrants. (via Facebook)

… The state’s Republican first-term U.S. senator is already in favor of  it. In fact, he and fellow Colorado U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet, a Democrat, co-sponsored legislation last fall — the DREAM Act of 2017 — to do just that after President Trump had rescinded the executive order that had been used to implement the policy under the Obama administration. The legislation would allow those brought to the U.S. as kids without documentation — they’re still subject to deportation despite growing up as Americans — to remain in the country. The bipartisan bill would reinstate the intent of former President Obama’s much-debated Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy, or “DACA.”

And yet, the protests-are-us rabble rouser Indivisible Denver staged a rally Wednesday in support of the DREAM Act that included a march on — you’ve guessed it! — Gardner’s office. The announcement via Facebook referenced the senator’s downtown Denver digs almost as if it were the campus quad back in the day: “We will meet at Benedict Fountain Park and host a press conference at 5:30. Afterwards, we shall march around Sen. Gardner’s office to gain more public support for a clean Dream Act.”

So, what’s up with that? Could be that Gardner’s office is already such a familiar landmark to Indivisible and other all-causes-left-of-center groups that they knew no one would get lost en route. Stalking the the senator has become almost a full-time endeavor for the in-crowd of devoted Democratic-leaning demonstrators, who have a bone to pick with him over just about anything, anytime — and anywhere.

Could also be that, as we know all too well by now, every year is an election year — never mind what you learned in civics class about the six-year terms of U.S. senators. No self-respecting, left-leaning group worth its salt is going to pass up an opportunity to throw darts at a Republican if there’s a chance he can be knocked off in the next face-off. Especially in perennially purple Colorado. We get it.

So, apparently, did some of the news media that covered the rally.

Denver Channel 4’s veteran news hound Rick Sallinger noted in the web edition of his report on the rally that, “Colorado Senators Cory Gardner and Michael Bennet have expressed sympathy and support for the demonstrators’ plight.”


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Kara MasonKara MasonJanuary 18, 20183min1108

Sometimes San Luis Valley law enforcement officers will wait to make an arrest until after the person has received medical care, according to local officials.

The reason they wait, according to the Valley Courier which reported the story last week, is because Medicaid will cover the medical costs. But once a person is arrested they lose most Medicaid benefits, and with a good number of inmates relying on Medicaid — more than 40 percent of the San Luis Valley’s population relies on the federal program — the tab is rapidly growing for local jails.

“We just really believe that that is an injustice,” Alamosa County Administrator Gigi Dennis reportedly said during a meeting with aides from Sen. Cory Gardner’s office.

The Valley Courier continues on the situation the rural southern region of the state is facing:

“I’m aghast that we treat our mental health in jail by putting them in jail,” Rio Grande Hospital CEO Arlene Harms said. “I just think that’s awful.”

Medicaid does cover the cost if an inmate stays at a hospital for 24 hours or longer. However, that doesn’t take care of quick visits to the pharmacy, dentist, emergency or clinic, which are the majority of visits.

For example, Jackson said an inmate that Alamosa County housed out in Custer County due to lack of beds suffered from an apparent heart attack. Custer County was ill equipped to handle the situation so they flew the inmate to Pueblo. The issue turned out to be an anxiety attack and because the inmate was discharged in less than 24 hours Alamosa County was left with a $23,000 flight bill.

To make matters worse, hospitals aren’t reimbursed through the hospital provider fee when treating jail populations, according to the Valley Courier’s reporting.

The news outlet adds that one solution local governments are considering is better utilizing ankle monitoring programs, since that wouldn’t terminate medical care.

And as for help from Congress and Gardner?

The senator’s aides said they couldn’t make any promises, but the meeting was good insight into the problem several southern Colorado communities are facing.