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Scott TiptonScott TiptonJuly 16, 20186min950

Last year, all eyes turned to North Korea as the hermit kingdom launched yet another ballistic missile, this time into the Sea of Japan. Actions like this pose a huge threat to global security and are cause for immediate concern. They also raise important questions, the main being: how do we better prevent hostile nations and dangerous organizations from gaining access to nuclear, chemical, biological and other hazardous weapons?


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Scott TiptonScott TiptonMay 15, 20186min198

The House of Representatives will soon consider a new Farm Bill. Unfortunately, there is a significant amount of misinformation being spread about some of its common-sense reforms that will prevent abuse of critical nutrition programs and ensure resources are reaching those who truly need them. It’s important to clear some of those up. In addition to providing certainty for American farmers by protecting important programs like crop insurance, this legislation includes policies that will improve the status quo and help millions of Americans escape poverty.


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Scott TiptonScott TiptonDecember 22, 20175min647

There are many challenges facing hard-working families trying to maintain their way of life in rural America, but one of their greatest obstacles may be lack of access to a physical bank or credit union. Bank accounts are an important tool for financial stability for Americans of all income levels in all parts of the country. Having a bank account helps families save money securely, pay bills in a timely fashion, and better plan for their future financial needs. While many of us can drive a short distance, walk into a bank, and open an account, there are rural communities across our state and the country where physical bank locations are few and far between. Luckily, mobile banking is increasingly improving access to financial services and has become especially important for customers in rural areas.


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Kara MasonKara MasonNovember 29, 20173min489

The spirit of two Colorado mountaineers is a little closer to living on in the form of mountains, with this week’s House passage of H.R. 2768.

CD3 U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton and U.S. Sens. Michael Bennet and Cory Gardner are working to pass a bill through Congress that would name two peaks on the border of San Miguel and Dolores Counties after Charlie Fowler and Christine Boskoff. Both died in 2006 during an avalanche on Genyen Peak in Tibet.

“Charlie Fowler and Christine Boskoff were celebrated mountaineers, but they were also known for their tireless advocacy for human rights, dedication to philanthropy, and stewardship of the environment,” Tipton said in a statement. “Through the designation of these peaks, their legacy and life’s work will live on for generations to come.”

The two peaks, located in Uncompahgre National Forest, are just more than 13,000 feet and will be called “Fowler Peak” and “Boskoff Peak,” respectively.

The duo were longtime residents of San Miguel County, according to the bill. But they loved mountaineering and traveled the world for it. Each had summited the world’s tallest mountains, including Everest, Cho Oyu and Shishapangma.

Fowler was an author, guide and filmmaker, according to the bill. Boskoff was one of the country’s top female alpinists.

Both were also known as advocates. They supported rights of porters and Sherpas, women’s education, gender equality and global literacy.

“The two are remembered not only as internationally acclaimed climbers, but also as mentors to school students and troubled youth,” said San Miguel County Commissioner Joan May in a statement in May. “Naming these peaks for them would serve as a perpetual reminder of the couple’s contributions to climbing, youth, and protecting the outdoors.”

With the passage of the bill, all documents, maps and records will refer to the two peaks by their new names.


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Scott TiptonScott TiptonNovember 10, 20175min369

This Saturday is an important one for our nation. It is a day to remember the service and sacrifice of our veterans. Since the founding of our nation, brave men and women have answered the call to serve during times of peace, and during times of great need. They put their lives on hold, often missing birthdays and anniversaries with their loves ones, in order to defend the many liberties that we as Americans hold dear. Without their bravery, we would not be the land of the free and the world would be a less stable one. 


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Kara MasonKara MasonSeptember 27, 20173min648

In places across Colorado that have been hit hard by the opioid crisis there are few resources, especially for those who’ve served in the military and find themselves with a substance-abuse problem. This week the state learned it’ll get nearly $400,000 for veteran drug courts.

The Department of Justice grant is being awarded to the Colorado Judicial Department, which has just a handful of courts aimed at veterans with trauma spectrum disorders. That can range from PTSD to substance abuse or other mental health challenges.

Pueblo, among the worst for opioid addiction in the state, and El Paso County, with a heavy military presence, each have a veteran treatment court. And Denver’s drug court has a veteran’s track. Even so, resources for veterans with substance abuse problems can be limited.

“Over the past year-and-a-half, I have traveled across the 3rd Congressional District and heard the stories of families and individuals who have been impacted by the opioid epidemic that is sweeping our nation. All of these stories are heartbreaking, but especially heartbreaking are the stories about veterans who return home and feel they have no other option but to seek comfort in drugs or alcohol,” said 3rd Congressional U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton in a statement, after learning of the grant award to Colorado.

Tipton’s district includes places such as Pueblo, where the veteran population nears 15,000 people in Pueblo County and has been highlighted as a hotspot for opioid addiction.

“Drug courts are an important path to recovery for many of these men and women, and I’m glad that Colorado has been awarded this funding to support and enhance the drug court program,” he said.

Veteran treatment courts received nearly half of the grant money the Justice Department awarded for opioid crisis-related programs across the nation, but they also further the department’s priority of “reducing crime by holding offenders accountable for their actions, and reducing victimization by intervening soon after arrest to prevent future crime.”

The DOJ awarded a total of $22.3 million to 53 jurisdictions for veteran drug courts, which the department describes as “‘one-stop-shops’ to link veterans with services, benefits and program providers, including the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Service Organizations and volunteer veteran mentors.”

Nearly one-fifth of veterans across the country have a substance abuse disorder, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs, and it’s estimated one-third of veterans seeking help for substance abuse have PTSD.


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Scott TiptonScott TiptonSeptember 21, 20176min431

Every year, in preparation for tax day, Americans spend 6 billion hours trying to navigate the internal revenue code and federal tax regulations (now up to 10 million words). The compliance bill has now reached $409 billion. The last time Americans experienced major tax reform was in 1986, under President Reagan. In the past few decades, the tax code has grown to a size that is unmanageable and overly complicated. In the House, we’re working to deliver a tax reform plan that will deliver relief and results for all Americans.