Twitter Archives - Colorado Politics
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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirFebruary 23, 20186min46200
Conservative Momma — on her Facebook page. (Facebook.com)

She’s a onetime improv comedian and Screen Actors Guild member who tilted right, tuned into politics and turned on to Facebook, YouTube and Twitter to pitch her brand of political satire. Her sharp-edged comedy sketches had started to develop a following, and some of her videos went viral.

That’s when the Douglas County-based “Conservative Momma” says the social-media behemoths took notice — but, evidently, weren’t laughing. They didn’t shut her down, but she says they did slow her down. She recapped the details in a blog post on her website last week:

It was on Youtube that I first saw my videos being marked as “unsuitable” for advertisers. As a Conservative Mom, doing political Satire, I was unable to monetize my videos. I then saw Facebook not allow me to boost my posts or videos, which had allowed me to drive traffic to my website. Facebook also would not allow some videos to be shared at all. My Twitter following came to a complete stand still.

And she believes it was because of her politics and the funny, and effective, way she comes across in her videos. (Hot Sheet would have put in a pro-forma call to Facebook, Google’s YouTube and/or Twitter for a response — but, well, you know. Like we’d ever hear back. They’re busy ruling the world.)

Fed up with the apparent push-back from the invisible hand of Big Social Media, she announced in a post via all her platforms on Valentine’s Day that she was taking a break to regroup and ponder next steps. She makes clear she’s not gone for good.

“I’m going to come back, I have to come back,” she elaborated Thursday when reached for comment. “I’m just taking a breath and also trying figure out a way to channel more people to my site.”

(Despite her budding prominence, the 36-year-old political activist, consultant, wife and mom of three uses only her stage name on her media platforms — and asked Hot Sheet to do the same. She says it’s a safeguard against some heated and even menacing missives she has gotten from critics on the other side of the political divide.)

While her work is meant to be provocative, she never expected it to provoke a response from the major social media themselves.

Her breakthrough video was what she acknowledges was something of a “rant” on YouTube last fall about standing for the National Anthem. It started growing her fan base but also was a turning point in another way.

“After that, everything got weird,” she said. The aforementioned bells and whistles that make social media really sing — the sharing, the promoting — stopped working. As she wrote in her goodbye-for-now blog post:

My videos that once had Millions and Hundreds of Thousands of views, now seeing only a couple thousand. My voice and the voice of many others silenced. In order to make up for the inability to monetize and drive traffic to my site I started a Patreon and Paypal account to counter. Facebook then started a new algorithm, making it almost impossible for my videos to be seen at all. A little over a month ago,I started a Live show, hoping that perhaps Live video could not be suppressed, it has been. Now only about 4% of my page sees my videos.

…and this:

It has been a battle. At this point, I am taking a break from it all. I believe in Conservatism. I believe in getting the RIGHT people elected. I believe in changing people’s minds and hearts, and the Social Media Giants, have handicapped my ability to do so here. There has got to be another way, and returning to a grassroots game where I started in creatively consulting candidates might be a good start.

 

 


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningJanuary 1, 20184min8200

Gov. John Hickenlooper on Sunday afternoon ordered flags lowered to half-staff immediately on all public buildings statewide until sunset Tuesday in honor of Douglas County Sheriff’s Deputy Zackari Parrish, who died in the line of duty responding to a domestic disturbance at an apartment complex in Highlands Ranch. Flags should be lowered from sunrise to sunset, the governor’s office said.


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Jessica MachettaDecember 24, 20173min4320

Former state treasurer and Democratic candidate for governor Cary Kennedy held a 25-hour “tweetstorm” Thursday, one tweet per hour for every new person that moves into Colorado, 25 each day.

Also this week, Kennedy unveiled her goal of improving the state’s transportation challenges and expanding broadband in rural areas.

“Growth is a top concern,” Kennedy said on Twitter. “My #CKplanforgrowth tackles issues like housing, transportation & protecting the Colorado we love.”

“Colorado has gone too long without preparing for growth,” she said in a press release. “Our deteriorating roads and inadequate transit systems hold our state back and cost us time and money. Our state is innovative and forward looking, but we haven’t made the necessary investments. I know as a working mom how frustrating it is when you miss dinner with your family because you’re stuck in traffic. We can do better.”

Kennedy’s four-tiered plan includes making Colorado affordable; protecting public lands and open spaces; investing in transportation, housing, water conservation, clean renewable energy and broadband; and standing up for middle-class families.

“I’ve watched Colorado’s population double since I was a kid,” Kennedy told Colorado Politics. “And now, forecasters are telling us it’s going to double again by the time my teenagers are my age.”

The political reality, however, is that she will have to pay for such goals and possibly wrangle support from moderates and Republicans, depending on which party holds majorities in the state House and Senate next year. That dynamic quickly fills lofty campaign promises with hot air.

While serving as chief financial officer for Denver, Kennedy helped start the city’s first affordable housing initiative, a plan she would make statewide if elected.

“People can’t afford to live in the communities where they grew up, and can’t afford to live in the communities where they work, so that’s added to our traffic congestion problem,” she said.