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Rachael WrightRachael WrightFebruary 16, 201711min302

… Twenty Years Ago This Week in The Colorado Statesman … An El Paso County Republican saga continued with self-proclaimed “true conservatives” toppling the “old guard,” seizing the reins of El Paso's Grand Old Party. After staking their campaigns on pro-life and Christian values, they went on to capture the top three party offices and 20 bonus member slots to the state GOP Central Committee. Many contended the social conservative sweep down south marked the end of the “big tent” era when party leadership preached tolerance for those with differing social views, particularly on the topic of abortion. The winners? Colorado Springs attorney Wayne Williams was elected chairman of the El Paso County Republican Party, Focus on the Family executive Tom Minnery won vice chairman and Leigh Ann Rauch was chosen secretary. All three were given a stamp of approval by a coalition of “true conservative” Republicans.


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightFebruary 9, 201712min339

…Thirty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … Ahhh, those were the days before the long arm of Amendment 41 arrived on the scene — a little heard of show was in town: Legislators on Ice, er, at least on the snow ... all funded by lobbyists who just wanted to make sure their favorite lawmakers were getting in some time for much needed recreation. Three dozen Colorado lawmakers participated in an annual legislative outing sponsored by Colorado Ski Country USA and the Colorado Association of Ski Towns, where they were treated to two days of skiing at Purgatory Ski Resort outside of Durango. Much like one of those time share schemes, the legislators, of course, also took part in informative sessions conducted each morning by the tour sponsors. During these sessions, CSCUSA and CAST took the opportunity to lobby their pet concerns. But first, the butter: “The ski industry,” said CSCUSA President John Lay, “is the single largest employer on the Western Slope, with a total employment of 44,500 in 1985, which in two years had risen eight percent.”