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Hal BidlackHal BidlackApril 17, 20186min510

Today is Tax Day, the day when the great reckoning arrives for millions of Americans. For some, it is a day of relief, when they finally sit down and crank the numbers for 2017 and find to their delight that they are getting a refund. Others, having delayed until the last possible moment, find that they owe Uncle Sam a chunk of change, or a wad of bills, or whatever your painful metaphor is for owing. Tax Day is a day that many greet with trepidation or even fear. Some argue that even the conceptof taxation is evil, and that taxation is theft. Many others argue that taxation is a necessary evil, but argue vociferously that taxes are too high and are unfairly collected. Only the most foolish would argue that Tax Day is actually a day for celebration.


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Joey BunchJoey BunchAugust 25, 20174min295

Recalling a recent conversation, City Councilman Merv Bennett said some people joke that Pikes Peak has been replaced as Colorado Springs’ most prominent landmark. Now, it’s orange traffic cones.

The ubiquitous cones marking detours around street work are a result of construction funded by 2C, a ballot issue approved by voters in November 2015 dedicating $250 million evenly split over five years to repair the city’s crumbling streets, curbs and gutters.

In its second year, work funded by 2C is under budget and ahead of schedule, Public Works Director Travis Easton said Thursday in a quarterly update. And revenues from the 0.62 percent sales tax are higher than last year.

Through June 30, the tax has generated $20.1 million, 12.9 percent higher than last year at the six-month mark, said Corey Farkas the city’s streets program supervisor. The city collected about $51 million in 2016.

Roadwork is also up for the year, Farkas said. In 2016, 229 lane miles were paved through the tax. This year, the city has finished 137 lane miles and is on track to complete 238 by October.

Much of the work is long overdue, and is scheduled for streets that wee the subject of frequent complaints, Farkas said.

“We’ve done a lot of work on Woodmen, which was in bad shape from Lexington all the way out to Black Forest. It’s a wonderful road to drive on right now,” he said. “We’ve also fixed Lake Avenue from I-25 all the way west. That was in really bad shape.”

Not everyone might be satisfied by the pace of construction, which often is slowed by having to coordinate work being done by different contractors and Colorado Springs Utilities, Farkas said.

“We don’t want to pave a road where Utilities has bad waterlines underneath and a waterline blows and we’re digging up new roads to replace their bad infrastructure,” he said.

Las Vegas Street was one street that required coordination, Farkas said, because a portion of the street is in front of the Springs Rescue Mission, which is expanding soon. To prevent having to cut through a newly paved street to connect underground utilities, the street work was pushed back from 2018 to 2019.

When voters passed 2C they approved a specific list of streets where about 1,000 lane miles worth of work will be done, Farkas said. All of those projects will be finished by 2020, when the tax ends. And there will likely be enough money left over to fund another batch of projects.

The tax also frees up other city funds that Public Works taps, Easton said, allowing it to better maintain streets that aren’t due for makeovers.

Farkas said five years of 2C work won’t cure all the city’s traffic ailments, but it’s a step in the right direction. He said he’d like to see the tax continued for a second round to fix more of the city’s 5,691 lane miles of streets.

A full list of ongoing and completed public works projects for 2017, which include 2C projects, can be found at www.coloradosprings.gov/publicworks.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningAugust 3, 20177min329

Routt County Treasurer Brita Horn, a Republican candidate for state treasurer, fired back Wednesday at county commissioners questioning the way she’s handled a mistake that left local taxing entities short nearly $6 million for months. Horn also denied the incident might damage her statewide campaign, telling Colorado Politics the imbroglio demonstrates she has the skills to handle problems in a treasurer’s office when they arise.


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Joey BunchJoey BunchJuly 25, 20175min461

Last week Colorado Politics was the first to tell you about Sen. Ray Scott’s talk on social media about taxing bicycles.

In an interview with us, the Republican pragmatist from Grand Junction said cyclists use the roads just like other forms of transportation, but unlike owners of those other forms of transportation, cyclists pay no taxes to help support the roads or services. Other vehicles, including motorcycles and ATVs, pay gas taxes and vehicle taxes and fees. As expected, the idea is getting pushback from cyclists.

A bike tax passed the Oregon legislature this year, but it was Democrats pushing it and Republicans opposing it.

Scott has a double purpose: to raise some much-needed money for transportation while exposing what he sees as a double-standard. And, thirdly, Scott loves to stir the pot of conversation and debate. He has a wicked sense of humor.

Can a bicycle outrun the tax man forever?

Here’s what Scott said Monday night on Facebook:

I’m a little shocked by the raw nerve I struck with my comments about leveling the playing field between cyclists, ATVs, snowmobiles and watercraft, when it comes to how we treat, and tax, these machines. But maybe I shouldn’t be, given how defensive bicyclists get when anyone raises the apparently politically-incorrect question of whether they benefit from a double standard and ought to pay a fairer share of the cost for the roadways they use with increased frequency. My attempt to start a conversation has been met with hysteria by some and reasonable ideas by others, reflecting a diversity of opinions on the subject that didn’t cut neatly along party or ideological lines.
The Denver Post, for instance, voiced support for bike taxes, while the Grand Junction Sentinel, came out hard against any discussion of the topic. The need to take swipes at me was the only thing both papers apparently agreed on. I’ve heard from normally-tax-averse Republicans supporting some type of tax, fee or assessment on bicyclists, and from Democrats who show zero support, even though their peers in liberal-leaning Oregon already have embraced the idea.
My tracking is showing a 50-50 split on both sides.
The 2018 legislation is still many months away, giving me plenty of time to weigh the wide variety of responses I’ve received and consider next steps. But I’m more convinced than ever, based on the live wire nerve I inadvertently struck when I raised the issue, that this is a debate worth continuing in the down time between legislative sessions, so that any concrete proposals that result can be refined and improved before the General Assembly meets again.
I sincerely appreciate the feedback and responses I’ve received, from all sides, and will be continuing to discuss the issue with colleagues and various stakeholder groups in the time between now and the next session. So keep those cards and letters, those tweets and emails and nasty-grams, coming, folks. This clearly is an issue the Coloradans feel passionately about, and something lawmakers might want to take up when we next meet.

Scott is planting seeds to yield food for thought, but he’ll have a hard time on this one. Cyclists have good friends in the legislature, including passionate riders in both chambers. But he also will have a hard time nailing down all 18 members of the Republican caucus in the Senate. The GOP has only a one-seat majority, but then again Democrats do like a tax for bike lanes and the great outdoors, so don’t count Scott out yet.