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Miller HudsonMiller HudsonAugust 9, 20187min465

Since Colorado voters pasted the TABOR amendment that steers spending and revenues into our state constitution in 1992, the myth of its sacrosanct power has been embroidered each year.  It is frequently viewed as the "third rail" of politics – attempt to tamper with it and you will surely die. However, only a slim majority approved Doug Bruce’s fourth attempt to handcuff government on an otherwise crowded ballot. While Bill Clinton won the presidential poll that year, Ross Perot’s message of budget rectitude scored its largest voter endorsement in Colorado.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirJanuary 12, 20184min512

Wikipedia reminds us it was the now-forgotten 19th century New York politician Gideon J. Tucker who observed, “No man’s life, liberty or property are safe while the Legislature is in session.”

It’s a sentiment that nowadays draws more applause on the right than the left. And among those whose daily toils include wooing and cajoling lawmakers to swing their way on the issues of the day, the put-down is rarely heard at all. (Obviously.)

Unless it’s the Colorado Union of Taxpayers. Whatever your philosophical take on the long-standing, tax-cutting, TABOR-lovin’, big-government-loathing advocacy group, you’ve got to give it at least grudging credit not only for sticking to its guns — but also for regularly sticking it in the General Assembly’s eye. Hence, CUT’s announcement today of a planned meet-and-greet and debriefing with a couple of sympathetic state lawmakers.

The announcement’s come-on? “Come Hear What They Are Doing to Us This Session!”

We added the boldfaced italics, but there probably was no need for you seasoned #coleg buffs — or for those of you familiar with CUT. In other words, it’ll be the kind of crowd where the old Reagan-vintage line, “We’re from the government, and we’re here to help,” still draws knee-slapping and guffaws.

If you’re game, here’s the rest of the announcement:

Legislative Kick Off

Come Hear What They Are Doing to Us This Session!
 
Senate Champion Vicki Marble and House Champion Tim Leonard
will share their insights on the 2018 Session.   

Where:
Independence Institute
(Free Parking) 
 
When: Thursday, January 25, 2018
Time: 7:00 a.m. 
 
Cost $20, free for paid 2018 membership  
(CUT annual membership $25) 
PO Box 1976, Lyons CO 80540 Taxpayer Hotline 303-494-2400


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirDecember 14, 20173min790

Denver’s attempt to rein in the “dark money” that drives, and sometimes distorts, a lot of campaign messaging has landed the city in court. A lawsuit filed in Denver District Court Wednesday by a public-interest litigation foundation out of Arizona — the libertarian-leaning, Phoenix-based Goldwater Institute — contends that provisions of the campaign-reform ordinance enacted by the Denver City Council in September are unconstitutional.

The suit was filed on behalf of two political-advocacy nonprofits that are a familiar presence on Colorado’s political right — the Colorado Union of Taxpayers Foundation and the TABOR Committee.

The new Denver campaign law, which has assorted other components not challenged by the suit, takes effect in January.

Calling the targeted provisions of the new law “unfair and unconstitutional,” a Goldwater press statement Wednesday says the measure, “requires nonprofits to give the government a list of their donors — including their occupations and employers — any time those groups spend as little as $500 communicating with voters about city ballot measures.” In other words, it effectively turns advocacy groups like the two plaintiffs into political or issue committees regulated by campaign laws.

The press statement continues:

…By undermining nonprofits’ speech rights, individual privacy is undermined as well.

“Since the 1950s, the Supreme Court has protected donors’ privacy when they contribute to nonprofits, ruling that government officials can’t force advocacy groups to turn over the identities of their supporters to public officials. But Denver’s new ordinance disregards this precedent entirely,” said Goldwater Institute Senior Attorney Matt Miller. “Nonprofits have the right to educate and speak up for what they believe in, and that’s why we’re asking the city of Denver to stop the enforcement of its donor disclosure ordinance.”

Goldwater also quotes the Colorado Union of Taxpayers’ Marty Neilson:

“Putting donors’ names, addresses, employers, and occupations on a government list makes them vulnerable to harassment and intimidation, … Nonprofits should be able to choose whether or not to make their donor lists public in order to persuade people to listen to what they have to say, but that should be their decision to make, not the government.”

The Denver Post reported Wednesday that the Denver Elections Division declined to comment on active litigation.

Goldwater says the Denver law is “the latest in a trend of cities cracking down on nonprofit donors’ First Amendment rights.” Santa Fe, N.M., enacted such a law in 2015, and one is under consideration in Tempe, Ariz.