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Tom RamstackTom RamstackJanuary 3, 201713min399

A bill approved by Congress this month has set up another struggle with the Environmental Protection Agency over compensation for the 2015 Gold King Mine spill that temporarily contaminated rivers in Southern Colorado, Utah and New Mexico. The bill requires the EPA to submit all claims from states, local governments and tribes within 180 days after President Barack Obama signs the bill into law, which is expected within days. It also would authorize federal funding for water quality monitoring of waterways contaminated by the spill into the Cement Creek and Animas River.


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Dan ElliottDan ElliottSeptember 8, 20167min364

A historic Colorado mountain town is on the threshold of a transformation after the federal government announced it will embark on an ambitious campaign to stanch the flow of acidic wastewater cascading from abandoned mines. The Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday designated an area north of Silverton as a Superfund site, clearing the way for a multimillion-dollar cleanup that could last years.


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Associated PressAssociated PressAugust 15, 20163min276

One of the nation's largest American Indian tribes is planning to sue over damages caused by a massive mine waste spill in southwestern Colorado. Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye, Navajo Attorney General Ethel Branch and other tribal officials will announce Tuesday that they have directed their attorneys to file a lawsuit over what they describe as an "unprecedented environmental disaster."