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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirSeptember 12, 20174min2140

It’s not unusual to see environmentalists on the political left come to the aid of homeowners aggrieved at developers over the latest shopping center or housing tract to intrude on their neighborhood. Less common but at least as potent is when elements of the tax-cutting, government-baiting political right link arms with the left on the same issue.

The left worries about the effect of growth and development on Mother Earth; the right worries about the impact on taxpayers’ wallets. Both end up railing against purportedly rapacious developers as well as at local land-use rules and tax policies that are said to subsidize development.

A commentary this week by Colorado College student columnist Max Kronstadt in his school’s independent student newspaper, The Catalyst, illustrates the point. An acknowledged left-leaner, Kronstadt approvingly quotes none other than Douglas Bruce — the father of Colorado’s taxing and spending limits — in an overview of an upcoming Colorado Springs ballot proposal that would assess a fee on residents to finance stormwater drainage upgrades. It’s a long-standing, hot-button issue in the city — home to both Bruce and Colorado College — that often turns into a barometer on sentiments about growth and development. Writes Kronstadt:

I had the opportunity to talk to Douglas Bruce, a former Colorado state legislator, anti-tax activist, and author of the controversial Colorado Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR). He argues that the city is milking its residents for money, putting unnecessary financial strain on low-income households. “The grandma who lives in a trailer pays the same as someone in a mansion in the Broadmoor—that’s a regressive tax,” Bruce said. He also argued that the city government relaxed regulations on developers and is now forcing residents to pay for it. “The city created the stormwater issue by subsidizing developers and giving them a free pass instead of forcing them to pay to deal with their stormwater. And they did that intentionally,” he said.

Kronstadt then notes: “Though Bruce and I likely disagree on many topics, I’m with him on this one. The City Council’s plans are a gift to corporations at the expense of taxpayers, particularly low-income ones. “

Kronstadt nonetheless concludes he’ll probably vote for the fee because, “Colorado Springs has already signed an intergovernmental agreement with Pueblo County that mandates we spend $460 million on stormwater infrastructure … and the money has to come from somewhere.”

The takeaway, though, is that nowadays, Coloradans are as likely to hear the likes of Douglas Bruce chiding cities for “subsidizing developers” as they are to hear it from Bruce’s onetime adversaries on the left.