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James AndersonJames AndersonMarch 1, 20177min336

A bill aimed at modernizing Colorado's Open Records Act has survived its first Senate hearing — but with an amendment that could mean trouble down the road. The GOP-led Senate State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee voted 4-1 Wednesday to send Senate Bill 40 by Democratic Sen. John Kefalas to the Senate Appropriations Committee.


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Paula NoonanPaula NoonanFebruary 15, 20175min346

Patrick Neville, House minority leader from Castle Rock, said at the state GOP’s Capitol Club gathering that, “We’re going to make sure we push some good red meat bills.” For those confused by the term, those are: School choice, religious freedom, Second Amendment rights and abortion. News stories outlining Neville's assurances were published in this very publication. Later, in the same journal but different issue, Neville complained about Democratic–sponsored joint resolutions in the Legislature that have asked the Trump administration to rescind its immigration executive order and to support a full range of reproductive health care for women. “How is this a productive use of our time,” queried Neville. He particularly pointed to the abortion resolution as counterproductive, saying it “antagonized members of his caucus.”


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Mario NicolaisMario NicolaisFebruary 1, 20175min357

A perennially contentious proposal, this year’s religious freedom restoration bill, HB 17-1013, died a faster, quieter death than in years past. Sent to the state house committee on State, Veterans, and Military Affairs — a Democratic “kill committee” — in January, the bill’s fate was a foregone conclusion. While the political tumult over the bill declined dramatically, it nonetheless remains a fascinating case study in divergent conservative viewpoints on the topic.