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Clarice NavarroClarice NavarroApril 18, 20175min474

There is an opioid crisis in Colorado and across the nation. Colorado, and especially southern Colorado, has seen an increase in use and abuse of opioids. Traditionally, when we hear the word opioid we think of the “junkie,” but that’s not where it ends or begins. With the rise in use and abuse, we see a rise in crime and opioid-related deaths. The use and abuse can be attributed to many things including cost, over prescribing and especially mental illness. As with other drugs that are abused, there are all of the negatives that follow, and our communities are seeing it firsthand. Our law enforcement agencies are overwhelmed, our hospitals must cope and we see a rise in crime rates. All of which beg the question, "What is being done?"


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinApril 17, 20175min351

While the state and federal governments have different definitions regarding the legality of marijuana, it's an even murkier picture when it come to marijuana's far less potent cousin, industrial hemp. And, as the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel reported, the differences surfaced over a water issue in southeastern Colorado. The Bureau of Reclamation denied a farmer's request for water because part of his crop was hemp. Further complicating the matter, the 2014 Farm Bill defined hemp as distinct from marijuana. There's a bill in the Colorado Legislature that brought the issue to light, so stay tuned.