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Mark ShermanMark ShermanApril 7, 20176min361

With Neil Gorsuch's confirmation as the 113th Supreme Court justice expected on Friday, it won't be long before he starts revealing what he really thinks about a range of hot topics he repeatedly sidestepped during his confirmation hearing. In less than two weeks, the justices will take up a Missouri church's claim that the state is stepping on its religious freedom. It's a case about Missouri's ban on public money going to religious institutions and it carries with it potential implications for vouchers to attend private, religious schools.


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Erica WernerErica WernerApril 6, 20179min487

The vote was 55-45, short of the 60 needed to advance Gorsuch over procedural hurdles to a final vote. All 44 Democrats and independents voted against advancing Gorsuch, and for procedural reasons, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell cast his vote with them to enable the vote to be reconsidered. Many senators voted from their seats, a rare and theatrical occurrence, then stayed in the chamber for the drama yet to unfold.


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Associated PressAssociated PressApril 3, 20172min466

Senator Michael Bennet says he will not join Democratic efforts to block a full-Senate vote on the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court. The Colorado Democrat has been under pressure to support Gorsuch in part because the nominee is also from Colorado. Bennet doesn't say whether he will ultimately vote in favor of Gorsuch. But he says he will not try to block a vote.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinMarch 14, 201710min429

A controversial federal rule designed to provide clarity for protection of America's water resources, and now under a presidential order for change or elimination, could cause further confusion and take the rest of President Donald Trump's term in office to be resolved, according to two Colorado State University researchers and news reports. The order was strongly supported by Republican members of Colorado's Congressional delegation who had opposed the rule since it was proposed by the Obama administration and scheduled to take effect in August 2015. One member attached an amendment to a bill that would require more local government involvement when similar rules are considered.