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Adam McCoyAdam McCoySeptember 11, 20173min1750

The opening salvo in the court fray over a Lakewood ballot initiative aimed at curtailing city growth turned into a six-hour marathon hearing late last week.

The Lakewood Sentinel’s Clarke Reader detailed the second day of administrative hearings which dragged on over half a dozen hours on Thursday and took testimony from 44 “petitioners, circulators and notaries, about the process leading to getting enough signatures to put the initiative before city council or on the ballot in November.”

The court battle started after citizens group Lakewood Neighborhood Partnerships (LNP) canvassed the city, gathering petition signatures in support of a 1 percent annual limit on residential growth. The group’s proposal would also establish a permit system, requiring City Council approval for all projects of 40 units or more while lifting permit requirements for redevelopment of existing units in “blighted or distressed areas.”

The group submitted the required number of petition signatures to the city, and the City Council was set to consider pushing the initiative to the ballot but had to delay action due to a legal challenge.

That formal protest was from Lakewood resident and Vice Chairman of the Jefferson County Republican Party Steve Dorman, contending the ballot initiative lacks an “adequate description.”

On Thursday, counsel for both sides — Dennis Polk for Dorman and former Secretary of State Scott Gessler for LNP board members — gave arguments centered on the validity of petition signatures, Reader reported. Polk argued that signatures were not submitted in accordance with city election law.

His point was that the bulk of the circulators’ affidavits were not signed and submitted under oath. Since the affidavits did not include language stating the circulators took an oath when they turned in the signatures, those petitions and signatures are not valid.

Countering that argument, Gessler argued that the act of signing was an affirmation of the validity of signatures, and that not making customers swear an official oath is common practice for notaries.



Rachael WrightRachael WrightJune 15, 20178min6
Thirty Years Ago this Week in The Colorado Statesman … On election night, 1987, incumbent Mayor Federico Peña went on to capture 79,674 votes for 51 percent of the total vote compared to challenger Don Bain’s 49 percent. The highlight (or lowlight) of the evening, was Peña’s sweltering downtown headquarters where 1,000 people crammed into […]

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Peter MarcusPeter MarcusMarch 2, 20176min7
The Colorado Court of Appeals on Thursday sent a case back to a lower court that could leave future funding for state and local elections in jeopardy. The case, filed by the National Federation of Independent Business, claims that businesses carry an unfair burden of the cost of funding state and county elections. The business group […]

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Peter MarcusPeter MarcusJanuary 24, 20177min6
A suit before the Colorado Court of Appeals today sought to reclaim revenue the state now uses to pay for its elections — leaving its future funding in question. The case, filed by the National Federation of Independent Business, claims that businesses carry an unfair burden of the cost of funding the state’s elections, including costs carried […]

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Colorado PoliticsColorado PoliticsDecember 12, 201619min90

DENVER — A state representative going to jail during the holidays? For the first time in decades ... Oh my! Wasn't there something about this in the Book of Revelations? Goodness. Good morning, and happy Monday. We guess it's happy. But it's sort of just a cold Monday. Stop it, stop it. Positive thoughts! HAPPY MONDAY! And positive vibes sent to all of you out there fighting through traffic or through your massive inbox pile stacked to the roof from inside your dreadful little cubicles. Only 29 days until the first day of school ... we mean legislative session, class! Good grief, there we go with the negative vibes again. Sorry.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinDecember 1, 201611min10

Colorado voters turned out at higher rates than all but two other states in the Nov. 8 general election, with most credit given to mail-in ballots. The 2016 general election was the first presidential election year with mail-in ballots used across Colorado, which had more than 71 percent of voters mark and return their ballots. Only Minnesota, with 74 percent, and New Hampshire, at 73 percent, were higher, according to figures from the United States Elections Project, an online information source that provides election statistics, electoral laws, research reports and other information regarding the U.S. electoral system. The national voter turnout average was 58 percent.


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Lynn BartelsLynn BartelsJune 30, 20167min150

When Kathy Packer started working at the age of 18, Dick Lamm was governor of Colorado, Federico Peña was mayor of Denver and Secretary of State Natalie Meyer was her boss. “Natalie was a very classy, professional lady, always very poised and put together,” Packer recalled. Packer would go on to work for seven more secretaries of state, including the current officeholder, Wayne Williams, before deciding to call it quits. Her last day was today, June 30. Her co-workers held a party to celebrate her 31½-year-career in state government, all at the Secretary of State’s office.