ToorOpEdMug-e1525410031740.jpeg

Will ToorWill ToorSeptember 6, 20186min816

This fall, Colorado voters will make important decisions about transportation funding, but they need the facts to reach the right choice. The hard reality is that just building more highway lanes won’t solve either the urban traffic mess or the economic struggles in rural areas. Instead, Colorado needs a healthy mix of ways to get around – some road work, certainly, but also more buses, bike lanes, carpooling, and similar efforts, as well as a combination of state and local projects. Recent research, in fact, underscores why even mountain towns and rural areas need better transit service.


Toor-Will-portrait-copy-e1488688782659.jpg

Will ToorWill ToorMarch 5, 20176min517

I am writing to refute Randall O’Toole’s recent guest opinion column claiming that there is no need for state funding for public transit. His opinion criticizes a recent report I authored for the Southwest Energy Efficiency Project showing that Colorado invests less than one cent per day per person of state funds in public transit, twenty times lower than the national average.


RTA-170125-1024x756.jpg

Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinJanuary 25, 201711min380

Voters in rural areas of Colorado would continue to be able to approve a property tax of up to five mills to fund mass transit systems in their local communities through 2029, under a bill approved by the House Transportation and Energy Committee Wednesday, Jan.25. House Bill 17-1018 extends the statutory authority of regional transportation authorities (RTAs) to ask local voters to approve such a tax within a specified area to be served by mass transit. Under current law, RTAs can seek voter approval to levy a property tax until Jan. 1, 2019.