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Joey BunchJoey BunchOctober 8, 201712min240
We got to see @repjamescoleman's @BarackObama impression tonight! @DenverDems #coleg pic.twitter.com/fZ8NXYLzdv — Lynn Bartels (@lynn_bartels) October 8, 2017 Today is just the most recent example of how TABOR is used to sabotage the simplest and most practical efforts to meet Coloradans' expectations of their state government. #coleg #copolitics — Scott Wasserman (@sjwasserman) October 3, 2017 […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchAugust 12, 20179min800


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningJune 26, 20178min95

A group of liberal advocacy organizations for the first time released combined legislative scorecards this week, conglomerating assessments of the 100 Colorado lawmakers’ votes last session on key legislation the organizations said they plan to present to voters next year. A Republican who received among the lowest overall scores, however, dismissed the endeavor as a “political stunt” and told Colorado Politics he doubts the predictable rankings — Democrats good, Republicans bad — give voters any meaningful information.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningMay 25, 201727min1381

By one measure, state Rep. Justin Everett, a House Republican serving his third term in the Colorado General Assembly, and state Reps. Chris Hansen and Chris Kennedy, a pair of Democrats in their first terms, stand as far apart as any lawmakers at the Capitol, based on the votes they cast in the just-completed 2017 regular session. Considering all the bills that made it to final, third-reading votes in the session — 490 in the House and 459 in the Senate — between them, these three legislators cast the most ‘no’ votes and the most ‘yes’ votes, respectively, according to an analysis prepared by bill-tracking service Colorado Capitol Watch.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningMay 6, 20179min1020

State Sen. Mike Merrifield discusses his love for the outdoors and the reason he doesn’t miss “The Big Bang Theory,” a sitcom about nerds, in a new episode of “Behind the Politics,” the weekly podcast produced by Colorado’s Senate Democrats. He also recalls with pride that he had the distinction during his first term in the House as the lawmaker who felt the wrath of the speaker’s gavel most often.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningApril 27, 201731min145

Arapahoe County Democrats say they’re working to resolve racial tensions within the party after a years-old remark about “too many blacks” running for office in the county resurfaced recently on social media and in a newspaper article, reigniting a long-simmering controversy. The conflict stems from a candidate training session conducted by party officials in Aurora nearly three years ago when comments — there’s sharp disagreement whether the handful of words were overly blunt, too clumsy, poorly chosen, insensitive or downright racist — left some uncomfortable and others offended, while still others contend the words were misinterpreted beyond recognition. But it’s what happened next that stoked rancor that persists years later, and that’s what party officials say they are determined to mend.



Joey BunchJoey BunchApril 24, 20175min47
The Colorado Senate gave initial approval to a bill that would allow crime victims to sue municipalities with sanctuary city policies, as well the state withholding tax money. Senate Bill 281 still must pass a roll-call vote before moving to the House, where it faces certain death before the House Democratic majority, which killed a […]

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