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Ernest LuningErnest LuningJanuary 22, 20185min1298

A bipartisan organization pushing ballot measures to change the way Colorado draws its legislative and congressional boundaries announced the support Monday of a number of groups representing rural, minority, business and civic reform interests. Fair Districts Colorado, a group chaired by Kent Thiry, the CEO of kidney dialysis giant DaVita Inc., said it now has the backing of Progressive 15 and Action 22, associations representing 37 counties in northeastern and southeastern Colorado, respectively; the African Leadership Group, an advocacy organization for African immigrants; Clean Slate Now, a group devoted to campaign finance reform; and Colorado Concern, an association of some of the state's top business executives.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningJanuary 3, 201810min804

The battle is heating up over how Colorado draws its legislative and congressional boundaries. After failing to knock out a pair of proposed redistricting and reapportionment ballot measures in court, a rough coalition of mostly liberal and good-government groups filed competing ballot measures in late December and is vowing to take the choice before voters this fall — potentially a case of, if you can't beat 'em in court, join 'em on the ballot.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningApril 6, 201723min729

Dick Wadhams, who chaired the state Republican Party for two terms and had a hand in electing the statewide officials who set the tone for the Colorado GOP across three decades, has a message for the party: Republicans have never had it easy in Colorado. “This has always been a competitive state; this has never been a Republican bastion,” he told the monthly meeting of the Highlands Ranch Republicans early last Friday morning.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningMarch 2, 201719min482

It was all elbows and Spartacus at a spirited forum featuring the candidates for state GOP chairman last Friday at a meeting of the Highlands Ranch Republicans. Former congressional candidate George Athanasopoulos, former El Paso County Republican Party Chairman Jeff Hays and Grand Junction activist Kevin McCarney, who chaired Donald Trump’s presidential campaign in Mesa County, introduced themselves and then took questions for nearly an hour at the GOP group’s monthly breakfast at Salsa Brava restaurant in Highlands Ranch.


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Colorado PoliticsColorado PoliticsNovember 17, 201612min337

Fifteen Years Ago this week in the Colorado Statesman ... When the cat’s away … While Colorado legislators were recessed, in their place, the Annual Youth in Government Program took over the House, Senate, judiciary and governor's seats to get a hands on lesson in government affairs. Entering its 48th year, the youth program sponsored by the YMCA of Metropolitan Denver — cast students as lobbyists, justices, pages, journalists and elected officials. More than 200 Colorado high school students from across the state participated. Students prepared at their own schools where bills were researched and written and students got a primer on parliamentary procedures. Then, during the three-day session at the Capitol, bills were run at length through the legislative process, from lobbying to debating. On the third day and final day the bills which were passed went to the youth governor, Robert Lee (Fairfield High School-Boulder), to sign or veto.