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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinMay 24, 20179min80

After nearly a decade, Denver Regional Transportation District’s University of Denver and Colorado light rail stations need to become more visible gateways to surrounding communities, rather than the "back doors" they now represent to their neighborhoods, according to a study of the two stations and their mobility possibilities. “It is time these stations transition from commuter stations to integrated mobility hubs and active local destinations,” reads an online City and County of Denver study description.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinMarch 21, 20175min820

Here's a whatever-happened-to update: If you remember Martha Ezzard from her time as a Colorado legislator, you should probably check out the story in the Denver Business Journal. A couple of decades ago, Ezzard and her husband, Dr. John Ezzard, moved to Georgia to run an Ezzard family farm. They turned it into a pretty successful winery and are now selling it and moving back to Colorado. Welcome back, Martha and John!


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David AppelhansDavid AppelhansMarch 8, 20176min830

In Colorado’s state Legislature this year, the issue on everyone’s mind is transportation. Coloradans know how badly we need funding for transportation — but it’s not just about building roads and bridges. Coloradans want to see investment in mobility options, such as buses for the elderly and safer routes to schools. We are writing today to urge the General Assembly to address the need for transportation options that exists in our communities and across the state.


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Randal O'TooleRandal O'TooleFebruary 26, 20177min711

According to a misleading new report, Colorado ranks 29th in per capita funding for transit, spending just one-twentieth of the national average. Thus, there is a “funding gap” for public transit. But Colorado apparently ranks 29th only in state transit funding. What’s left out is that most transit funding comes from the regional level. The misleading data are part of a report by a Boulder group known as the South West Energy Efficiency Project (SWEEP), which is urging the state Legislature to spend more money on transit. But this recommendation is based on three fallacies.


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Miller HudsonMiller HudsonMay 19, 20166min760

RTD’s cumbersomely named University of Colorado A Line — it cost CU $5 million for the “branded sponsorship” — is an A Train linking Union Station with DIA, covering 23 miles of commuter rail that can be traversed in 37 minutes. With its April opening, Denver joined a growing number of American cities where travelers can take a train to a plane and back. Not all of these have proven a success. San Francisco’s BART extension provides access to nearly 10 million Bay Area residents, where daily commutes are frequently horrific and ridership has been high. Philadelphia, by contrast, runs virtually empty cars several times an hour.