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Julie PaceJulie PaceNovember 12, 20168min356

Donald Trump may take a victory tour to states that elected him president, an aide said Saturday, as boisterous protests unfolded outside the tower where he holed up with members of his transition team and fielded calls congratulating him. While he's announced one decision — putting Vice President-elect Mike Pence in charge of the transition instead of Chris Christie — Trump must identify other people for top White House jobs and Cabinet posts. The president-elect remained out of sight at Trump Tower, with streets outside swarming with thousands objecting to the results of Election Day. At one point, documentary filmmaker Michael Moore, a liberal critic of Trump who nevertheless had predicted his victory, entered the tower lobby with a camera crew in tow and asked to see Trump. "I just thought I'd see if I could get into Trump Tower and ride the famous escalator," said Moore, who did just that until he reached the fourth floor and the Secret Service told him he could go no higher.


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Clifford D. MayClifford D. MayNovember 10, 20168min353

Andrew Roberts, one of the world’s great historians, took America to task just over one week ago. Let me rephrase that: He took Americans to task for what they — or rather we — are doing to these United States during an election season that often seems like a satirical novel, albeit one that would have benefited from more rigorous editing.


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Alan SudermanAlan SudermanOctober 3, 20169min342

With the first presidential debate complete and its spin cycle nearly over, the two understudies are getting ready to take the main stage. The vice presidential debate Tuesday will be the only time Republican Mike Pence and Democrat Tim Kaine will for the most part have the nation's political attention all to themselves, away from their much better-known running mates. The stakes will be lower than the three presidential debates, but will give each largely undefined candidate a chance to make a mark on a national audience.


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Chris RugaberChris RugaberOctober 3, 20168min309

For America's wealthiest families, the presidential campaign presents a stark choice: A big tax increase if Hillary Clinton wins the election — or a big tax cut if Donald Trump wins. For everyone else? Right now, neither candidate is proposing major tax changes. Tax policy is one of the issues on which the two nominees differ most. Their approaches are likely to draw new attention in the wake of a New York Times report that Trump's nearly $916 million in losses in 1995, according to tax records the paper received anonymously, means he may not have paid federal income taxes for as many as 18 years.