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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirNovember 27, 201715min716

Developers are great at looking over the horizon, envisioning what’s next for a community and then building it. But how do you draw those same dynamic economic forces back to parts of the community that have seen better days and could use a turnaround before they hit bottom? That’s where an agency like the Colorado Springs Urban Renewal Authority comes in. It partners with developers and creates incentives for them to inject a dose of vitality into declining neighborhoods. It’s a complicated and lengthy undertaking that faces lots of political challenges, but a successful project can breathe new life into an area for miles around. Authority Chair Wynne Palermo — a veteran of the Colorado Springs real estate scene — walks us through the process. The longtime REALTOR, community volunteer and prominent civic activist has been a driving force with the influential Pikes Peak Association of REALTORS. In today’s Q&A, she holds forth on the success of urban renewal in Colorado’s Second City — offering what could be a template for other communities along the Front Range and beyond.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirOctober 2, 20175min381
Clarissa Arellano-Thomas is both book-smart and street-smart about the state’s political scene. To the former point: She holds a Ph.D. in public policy. ‘Nuff said. As for the latter: She has been in the trenches for over two decades and knows just about everyone in El Paso County’s political pantheon, past and present — as […]

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