Joey BunchJoey BunchSeptember 19, 20173min813

You can’t blame the Colorado Farm Bureau for being in the afterglow of the sixth Pedal the Plains last weekend. The annual event highlights the very farm ranch communities on the Eastern Plains that the organization represents in the halls of power.

“This is one of our favorite events,” said Chad Vorthmann, the executive vice president of the Colorado Farm Bureau, told Colorado Politics. “Everyone is excited to be out in rural Colorado. And local residents are excited to have them, explain what they do, showcase their products, and their communities. It’s a fantastic opportunity to bring different Coloradans together.”

The 177-mile trek from Friday to Sunday — from Kersey to Keenesburg on Day 1, then Keenesburg to Brush on Saturday, then Brush back to Kersey on Sunday, a ride that gained about 1,547 feet of elevation while passing the farms, ranches and small towns that sometimes get overshadowed by the state’s more famous mountain sports events.

The Greeley Tribune reported there were more than 1,000 riders this year through Morgan, Logan and Weld counties. The Colorado State Patrol warned Saturday about nails and screws scattered in the road near Brush.

“There’s no better way to connect with our rural communities than by taking time out to ride a bike through them,” Gov. John Hickenlooper said when he announced this year’s route in April. “This tour is the perfect way to bring an economic boost to three of our stellar rural communities while wrapping up the summer’s riding season.”

Proceeds from the ride benefit the Denver Post Community Foundation, which makes grants to local communities, as well as Colorado FFA and Colorado 4-H.

The Eastern Plains’ political and advocacy powerhouse trifecta of Farm Bureau, Coloradans for Responsible Energy Development and Keep Electricity Affordable formed the #FarmPower team for the third year in a row, the Farm Bureau said, adding that their message was Tthe importance of energy production to agriculture.

Vorthmann rode not only in the 177-mile Pedal the Plains, but also the associated Century-Plus extenstion on Saturday for a total of 235 miles.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningApril 17, 20173min444

Kersey and Keenesburg and Brush, oh my! The sixth annual Pedal the Plains bicycle tour will give riders a chance to get close to lions, tigers and bears — along with other wild animals — housed at the Wild Animal Sanctuary in Keenesburg, one of several features along the 177-mile route, Gov. John Hickenlooper and Denver Post Chairman Dean Singleton announced Monday.