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Clifford D. MayClifford D. MayNovember 3, 20168min394

Ayman al-Zawahiri was correct. Believed to be ensconced in the tribal lands of Pakistan, the leader of what’s sometimes called al Qaeda Central has dedicated his life to a jihad that he hopes and prays will lead to the founding of a new and mighty Islamic empire. But he understands the value of strategic patience. In particular, he recognized that establishing a caliphate before conditions were favorable for its survival and expansion could only be unhelpful, causing Muslims to doubt whether spreading Islamic domination in the 21st century is a divinely blessed mission.


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Clifford D. MayClifford D. MayOctober 6, 20169min513

Millions of people want to come to America. Actually, it’s tens of millions or perhaps hundreds of millions. Some Americans believe our borders should be open — that everyone has a “right” to live in the United States. That seems to me both mistaken and impractical. But I also disagree with those who would shut the doors to all refugees, asylum seekers and immigrants. Such people have enriched and enlivened the United States in the past and can do so long into the future. What lies between these two extremes is prioritization, considering what’s best for America and what most Americans want, and how many people from various corners of the world can be successfully welcomed and integrated into a modern welfare state, one that continues to add costly entitlements. Humanitarian concerns need to be taken into account, too, because most Americans are humanitarians.