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Jessica MachettaDecember 8, 20173min1070
“It’s just the right thing to do,” said Sen. Matt Jones, D-Louisville, who’s drafting a bill to give local government control over oil and gas exploration and production. “Local governments plan, zone and deny requests all the time,” Jones said. “It should be the same for oil and gas and fracking, especially following the tragic explosion […]

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Clifford D. MayClifford D. MayJune 8, 20179min332

The slaughter of 22 concert-goers in Manchester May 22 was followed four days later by the murder of 29 Christians traveling by bus to a monastery in the desert south of Cairo. The Islamic State claimed responsibility for both attacks. In an internet video, a masked spokesman denounced the victims — many of them teenage girls, fans of pop singer Ariana Grande — as “crusaders.” As for Egyptian Christians, also known as Copts, they have been described in other Islamic State videos as “our favorite prey.”


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Valerie RichardsonValerie RichardsonJanuary 15, 201714min793

The fossil fuel divestment movement may be losing steam in Colorado, but activists are hoping to reverse the slide by convincing the University of Denver to sell off its investments in coal, oil and natural gas. The University of Denver Board of Trustees is scheduled to consider at its Jan. 20 meeting a report from the board’s Divestment Task Force, which has met seven times since it was formed in response to an April request from the student organization Divest DU. So far divestment has failed to catch on in Colorado despite the best efforts of climate-change groups such as New York-based 350.org, which has championed the strategy as a way to tar the oil-and-gas industry's public image and bottom line.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinNovember 16, 20164min402

Calling it "the worst of both worlds," Colorado House Minority Leader Patrick Neville, R-Castle Rock, is warning a road usage charge program proposed by the Colorado Department of Transportation would mean a massive statewide tax hike. State Rep. Patrick Neville, R-Castle Rock State Rep. Patrick Neville, R-Castle Rock In a brief statement released Tuesday, Nov. 15, Neville voiced opposition to such a program.