New American Economy Archives - Colorado Politics
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Joey BunchJoey BunchDecember 7, 20173min1640

Metropolitan State University of Denver is putting on a roundtable Thursday for Colorado business and community leaders to talk about the economic benefit of immigrants covered by DACA.

The discussion is part of a broader national campaign to urge Congress to reinstate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, passed by President Obama to shielded people brought to this country as children from deportation.

President Trump signed an executive order ending the program, but activists, Democrats and even otherwise conservative business leaders are urging Congress to reinstate the so-called Dream Act.

The program allowed an estimated 690,000 immigrants brought to this country as children to receive two-year renewal work permits, including about 17,000 in Colorado.

The iMarch, as it’s called, is in Room 440A3 of the Student Success Building at Metro State on the Auraria Campus in Denver.

The iMarch for Immigration Campaign is a national day of local events in all 50 states, organizers said.

iMarch will highlight the voices of leaders in the business, agriculture, education, tech, and faith sectors, and the support of state and local elected officials.

The Denver speakers are slated to be:

  • Jeff Wasden, president of the Colorado Business Roundtable
  • Janine Davidson, president of Metro State University
  • Chad Vorthman, executive vice president of the Colorado Farm Bureau

The event is supported by the New American Economy, the Colorado Business Roundtable and Voto Latino.

Colorado Politics has told you about the work of the New American Economy before. The national coalition of more than 500 Republican, Democratic and independent mayors and business leaders is urging Congress to act on comprehensive immigration reform for the sake of the economy.

“Coalition members include mayors of more than 35 million people nationwide and business leaders of companies that generate more than $1.5 trillion and employ more than 4 million people across all sectors of the economy, from agriculture to aerospace, hospitality to high tech and media to manufacturing,” the organization said in a statement.

The Colorado Business Roundtable advocates for business-supportive legislation in the state and across the West, working with industries, chambers of commerce, educational institutions and government leaders.

“Our goal is to improve the business environment, increase effectiveness and expand the reach of our partners,” the organization states.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningJuly 21, 201721min114

Despite concerns earlier this year that the new Trump administration’s hardline immigration policies would lead to labor shortages across Colorado’s agricultural sector, growers and their advocates are breathing a sigh of relief as the harvest approaches, confident they’ll have the hands to pick and package what could be a bumper crop. But even though one component of the country’s sprawling immigration system appears to be working as it has been this summer, industry experts and a newly formed state coalition of business and civic leaders say that doesn’t mean the entire system is any less broken.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirJune 13, 20174min1310

Just in case you didn’t get enough of the immigration debate during Colorado’s 2017 legislative session, New American Economy thought you’d like some fodder for starting your own discussion on the subject in the off season.

The business-backed, pro-immigration advocacy group started in 2010 by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and major CEOs — love ’em or not — has become a repository of facts and figures about the role immigrants play in the U.S. economy. (Whether the immigrants are documented or otherwise.)

The group sends the media regular updates. The latest arrived over the transom this week, announcing, “We’ve now mapped the impact of immigration in over 100 of the largest metropolitan areas in the United States,” and it invites you to click on a button and get relevant economic data for immigrants in a selected city or state.

How does Colorado stack up?

Colorado is home to some of the nation’s fastest-growing cities. From 2013 to 2014, Greeley and Fort Collins ranked among the top 20 fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country. Foreign-born residents moving to the state have been a critical driver of that population growth. By 2014, more than half a million immigrants were living in the state. These new Americans serve as everything from technology entrepreneurs to farm laborers, making them critical contributors to Colorado’s economic success overall.

Some specifics:

  • Colorado has 532,903 foreign-born residents, or 10 percent of the state’s population.
  • These immigrants paid $3.3 billion in total taxes in 2014, the latest year for which data is available. $1.1 billion of that was state and local taxes.
  • Immigrants pumped $10.8 billion into the economy that year.
  • There were 32,115 immigrant entrepreneurs who owned businesses.

There’s also a section on undocumented immigrants, who, according to New American Economy, comprise 189,130 of Colorado’s immigrants and paid $313.7 million in total taxes. The section includes this commentary:

The United States is currently home to an estimated 11.4 million undocumented immigrants, the vast majority of whom have lived in the country for more than five years. The presence of so many undocumented immigrants for such a long time presents many legal and political challenges. But while politicians continue to debate what to do about illegal immigration without any resolution, millions of undocumented immigrants are actively working across the country, and collectively, these immigrants have a large impact on the U.S. economy. This is true in Colorado, where undocumented immigrants contribute hundreds of millions of dollars in taxes each year.

There’s more data, too, including a breakdown of Colorado’s immigrant population by economic sector — from agriculture to science, technology, engineering and math.

However you choose to interpret the data — and wherever you come down on immigration policy — there’s plenty of information here to serve as a conversation starter. Maybe even enough to keep you busy until the official face-off begins again in the General Assembly next January.



Joey BunchJoey BunchApril 13, 20175min101
A whole bunch of smart Coloradans signed a letter to President Trump saying immigration is good for the American economy. The 18 Colorado economists added their voices to a national campaign started in February by the New American Economy and the American Action Forum, two organizations hard to portray as liberal gunslingers. “The undersigned economists represent […]

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Peter MarcusPeter MarcusFebruary 27, 20175min59
Colorado business leaders – including Republican interests – are trying to put a face to immigration by highlighting the economic impact immigrants have on the country. The effort comes as President Trump explores expanded deportations and travel restrictions for undocumented immigrants, going as far as to threaten to punish local governments for interfering with any […]

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