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Aaron M. JohnsonAaron M. JohnsonJuly 18, 20186min396

How far does a national park extend past its boundary line? In the case of the Great Sand Dunes National Park, we’re told the boundary stretches past the gate, over a mountain range, and across a valley on the other side. That’s according to anti-fossil fuel activists working to stop oil and natural gas leasing east of the park and on the other side of the mountains on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management for multiple uses.


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Tom RamstackTom RamstackSeptember 13, 20176min414
WASHINGTON — A congressional committee considered a bill this week to expand recreational opportunities for hunters and fishermen, but the legislation also would make it easier to buy gun silencers. The bill’s Republican supporters said during a hearing that silencers would protect the hearing of hunters and gun enthusiasts. Colorado Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Cortez, is […]

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David O. WilliamsDavid O. WilliamsDecember 30, 201615min355

Despite a growing list of climate change doubters and fossil fuel industry supporters and executives comprising the list of Trump administration cabinet nominees, Democratic Colorado lawmakers and environmentalists are hopeful the state’s clean energy economy and outdoor recreation industry can continue to thrive. Mostly, though, there’s a growing sense of dread from the conservation community as President-elect Donald Trump picks people like Republican Montana U.S. Rep. Ryan Zinke for the post of Interior Secretary, former Republican Texas Gov. Rick Perry for Energy Secretary and ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson for Secretary of State. Oil and gas industry representatives, meanwhile, are eagerly looking forward to Trump’s inauguration Jan. 20. About a third of Colorado is owned by the federal government and managed by the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service. Coal mining and oil and gas companies have for the past eight years of the Obama administration lamented environmental regulations perceived as hurdles to energy production on public lands.