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Rachael WrightRachael WrightMay 11, 20177min354

Twenty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … A new welfare law was finally agreed upon and the Legislature narrowly averted a special session. “That’s the art of compromise,” Gov. Roy Romer said. He said he would sign the latest version of the state's welfare reform law that had successfully met the requirements of new federal laws while passing muster on both sides of the Legislature's aisle.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinMarch 29, 20177min309

A five-party funding arrangement is to be considered by Denver City Council that would eventually allow some 2,800 new homes to be built on the former Stapleton International Airport property, which was decommissioned in the mid-1990s. The Stapleton “Five Parties” (City and County of Denver, Denver Urban Renewal Authority, Denver Public Schools, Forest City and Park Creek Metropolitan District) have agreed on an arrangement to fund and build an additional school, fire station and other infrastructure at Stapleton.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinJanuary 25, 201711min357

Voters in rural areas of Colorado would continue to be able to approve a property tax of up to five mills to fund mass transit systems in their local communities through 2029, under a bill approved by the House Transportation and Energy Committee Wednesday, Jan.25. House Bill 17-1018 extends the statutory authority of regional transportation authorities (RTAs) to ask local voters to approve such a tax within a specified area to be served by mass transit. Under current law, RTAs can seek voter approval to levy a property tax until Jan. 1, 2019.