Trump-Immigration_Prat-1280x922.jpg

Kara MasonKara MasonNovember 17, 20173min570

It’s been nearly two months since the Aurora City Council first took on a resolution supporting the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, also known as DACA. Now after a round of revisions in a committee, the governing body is back to where it started.

But it’ll likely be a more conservative council that gets the final decision on the resolution.

Councilman Charlie Richardson first submitted the resolution. It was in support of legislatively extending DACA and Aurora Congressman Mike Coffman’s BRIDGE Act. Richardson said voting for the resolution, which would have been a symbolic measure of support for the protections of young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally, was simple and shouldn’t require so much back-and-forth from council.

But some council members, including Sally Mounier who represents a significantly diverse portion of the city, thought the resolution should encompass immigration issues as a whole.

The Aurora Sentinel has been following the story:

After Councilwoman Sally Mounier requested the first resolution be sent back to a committee, two more resolutions were drafted by the city attorney’s office. One was a revised “short” version, which mostly focused on DACA. The other was dubbed the longer version and was intended to support immigration reform as a whole.

“I totally support a path to citizenship for the DACA kids. What I also support, though, is a total and complete immigration reform… It is time to tell Congress that we have multiple issues with immigration,” the Sentinel reported Mounier saying during the first meeting at which Richardson’s resolution was presented to the council.

Mounier lost her seat last week to upstart candidate Crystal Murillo who ran a campaign largely on the premise she could better represent the district because she is a young Latina.

This week, the council reviewed the two versions. But neither satisfied the council. Both failed to make it to the regular meeting.

Richardson said he had another resolution ready to submit. He called it the “clean” version. This time it made no mention of Coffman’s BRIDGE ACT or the Trump administration. Just support for DACA.

That’s slated to be in front of council at next week’s meeting. Four new council members — three of which are slated to be more progressive than the rest of council — will join council on Dec. 4.

Five seats were up for election. Marsha Berzins won her seat in Ward III.

 


Jason-Crow-DSC-W.jpg

Ernest LuningErnest LuningNovember 17, 20178min2010

Jason Crow, one of three Democrats running for the chance to take on Republican U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman in the 6th Congressional District, was one of 11 candidates nationwide named this week to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s "Red to Blue" program, which provides fundraising and organizational support in districts the party organization hopes to flip in next year's midterm election.


Tancredo-Trump-Polis-Site.jpg

Ernest LuningErnest LuningNovember 10, 20174min14630

U.S. Rep. Jared Polis, a Democrat running for governor of Colorado, on Thursday launched an attack tying Tom Tancredo to President Donald Trump, charging the GOP gubernatorial candidate and Trump are "ideologically one and the same" — but far from rejecting the attack, Tancredo fired back, calling Polis "just another whiny liberal elite."


Roger-Edwards-Restaurant-W.jpg

Ernest LuningErnest LuningNovember 7, 20177min10090

Douglas County Republican Roger Edwards plans to announce Wednesday that he’s challenging U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman in next year’s GOP primary, charging the five-term incumbent with paying lip service to conservative priorities and using “identity politics” to divide residents of the battleground 6th Congressional District, he told Colorado Politics.


twitter-bird-1366218_960_720.png

Joey BunchJoey BunchNovember 4, 201710min2170


Pence-AP-DTC.jpg

Ernest LuningErnest LuningOctober 27, 201711min16060

Vice President Mike Pence on Thursday told a ballroom full of Republicans in Greenwood Village that a unified GOP will fulfill a key campaign pledge of President Donald Trump by enacting tax reform legislation. “I’m going to make a prediction tonight: We’re going to pass the largest tax cut in American history, and we’re going to pass it this year,” Pence told about 300 donors at a fundraiser for the Colorado Republican Party at the Denver Marriott Tech Center.


iStock-501665299.jpg

Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirOctober 24, 20172min2200

The GOP’s 6th CD U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman and a Democratic counterpart in Congress have introduced the Homeless Veteran Families Act — which aims to unite homeless vets’ families. A press announcement from Coffman’s office says H.R. 4009, which the Aurora Republican is sponsoring with California Democratic U.S. Rep. Julia Brownley, “aims to assist community agencies who help homeless veterans with dependents, with housing costs — thus helping keep families together.”

The press release explains the mechanics:

The Veterans Affairs’ (VA) Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem (GPD) Program is offered annually by the VA’s Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program to fund community agencies providing services to homeless veterans.  H.R. 4099 would provide the Veterans Affairs’ (VA) Secretary with the authority to reimburse GPD providers at a 50% rate for the costs of housing minor dependent(s) of homeless veterans while the veteran receives services from the grant recipient.

… Currently, the VA does not have the statutory authority to provide the reimbursements for the costs of services for minor dependents of homeless veterans. This in turn makes the GPD provider pay out of pocket for those services. As a result, some homeless shelters actually give preference to non-veteran homeless families because under the HHS program they do get a per diem for the minor dependent(s).

Coffman is quoted:

“As a Marine combat veteran, I take pride in being able to help those who have served our nation … The bipartisan ‘Homeless Veteran Families Act’ ensures we can offer homeless veterans and their children a safe shelter during their times of hardship and keep families together.”

The legislation has the endorsement of the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans, among other groups.