Ernest LuningErnest LuningJuly 21, 201717min406

Despite concerns earlier this year that the new Trump administration’s hardline immigration policies would lead to labor shortages across Colorado’s agricultural sector, growers and their advocates are breathing a sigh of relief as the harvest approaches, confident they’ll have the hands to pick and package what could be a bumper crop. But even though one component of the country’s sprawling immigration system appears to be working as it has been this summer, industry experts and a newly formed state coalition of business and civic leaders say that doesn’t mean the entire system is any less broken.


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Morgan SmithMorgan SmithJune 19, 20177min414

Now that the Trump administration has initiated the process of renegotiating the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), let’s hope that this process is marked by thoughtfulness and not rhetoric like the president’s earlier comments that NAFTA was “the worst trade deal in history.” Despite the anti-trade rhetoric, NAFTA has been ...


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinFebruary 6, 201710min349

President Donald Trump’s proposed 20 percent import tax on Mexican products to pay for an immigration control wall along the border between the U.S. and Mexico would have a big impact on Colorado’s rural economy, according to economists. Such a tax would increase the price of Mexican goods for U.S. consumers, who would ultimately pay for Trump's immigration control wall on the border between the two countries, opponents say. Any such tax hike would require approval from Congress, and among members of Colorado's Congressional delegation who reacted to Trump's wall and import tax proposal or responded to requests from The Colorado Statesman, Republicans took a wait-and-see stance while Democrats were opposed.



Peter MarcusPeter MarcusJanuary 30, 20174min299
U.S. Sen. Corry Gardner, a Republican, will oppose imposing a 20-percent import tax on Mexican imports, a sign that the Trump administration may face difficulties convincing Congress to back the proposal. Gardner, who was recently tapped to head Senate Republicans’ campaign fundraising with the National Republican Senatorial Committee, said he fears the tax would start a trade fight […]

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Nicholas RiccardiNicholas RiccardiOctober 30, 20168min455

Donald Trump's rhetoric on immigration is testing a long-term trend among Hispanics: Members of a family that has been in the country for multiple generations and uses primarily English are more likely to vote Republican than those who more recently arrived in the United States. The number of Latinos in the United States is growing, making them a key demographic group whose votes are coveted by both major parties. While traditionally they vote for Democrats, that support isn't ironclad.


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Jared WrightJared WrightOctober 5, 20165min410

Already dealing with parched conditions, the U.S. Southwest faces the threat of megadroughts this century as temperatures rise, says a new study that found the risk is reduced if heat-trapping gases are curbed. Oppressive dry spells lasting at least two decades have gripped the Southwest before, but scientists said future megadroughts would be hotter and more severe, putting a strain on water resources. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances, is the latest to find that droughts more extreme than what is currently being experienced could become more common as the planet warms.


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Michael ReaganMichael ReaganSeptember 2, 20166min378

Donald Trump actually looked like a statesman in Mexico City Wednesday afternoon. It didn’t matter what he and the president of Mexico talked about. It didn’t even matter if they made a secret handshake deal to split the cost of building the great Wall of Trump.


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Nicholas RiccardiNicholas RiccardiAugust 31, 20169min314

Donald Trump's attempt to clarify his immigration policy instead muddied some of the actual circumstances for people in the country illegally and their impact on the U.S. economy. A look at some of his statements after a meeting with Mexico's president Wednesday and his immigration-focused night rally: