Marianne GoodlandMarianne GoodlandMarch 25, 20188min288
A review of the lighter side, usually, of what happens at the state Capitol. Getting a little hard to find the humor of things these days… That said, off to the races.   Bet you’ve never seen something like this before…The picture below shows a center cut from a tree that played an important role […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchMarch 14, 20186min735

The Colorado Senate considered a bill to beef up funding for transportation without raising taxes Wednesday but it bogged down in amendnents about where the money would go, as well as delivering a tacit protest of the bill's sponsor. Senate Bill 1 would ask voters in November to set aside more than $300 million a year in existing sales taxes and fees to repay more than $3.5 billion in loans to jump-start major projects, especially widening Interstate 25 north of Monument and Denver, as well as the I-70 mountain corridor.


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Joey BunchJoey BunchMarch 13, 20183min440

State Sen. Bob Gardner was having breakfast reading the newspaper when he saw that a public-sector union was on strike elsewhere in the country. The Republican from Colorado Springs was not supportive. "And I got to thinking about the fact that those collective bargaining agreements are often negotiated by people who are being paid by the taxpayers to negotiate against the interests of the elected officials and the government that the taxpayers fund," he told the Senate chamber Monday morning.


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Joey BunchJoey BunchFebruary 8, 20182min790

The conservative policy-shaper Americans for Prosperity held its annual lobby day at the Capitol Thursday with a free box lunch for members and legislators who participated in their program.

No Democrats showed up to speak in the West Foyer of the state Capitol, though some joked that they liked the annual handouts from the organization that eschews government handouts. Sen. Matt Jones, D-Louisville, showed off his collection of AFP swag in his office, but he didn’t show up later for the doughnuts or lunch offered by the organization.

House Republican Leader Patrick Neville explained the difference to the AFP crowd.

“It’s great to hear from good citizens,” Neville said. “We’re surrounded by a lot of different special interests down here at the Capitol, and they’re all arguing for more and more money. What they don’t realize a lot of times is that it’s your money.”

He added, “We want you to have more money in your pockets and less in the special interests up here. That way when you have more money, the economy grows, we all prosper and Colorado becomes more affordable.”

Neville and Senate President Kevin Grantham, R-Cañon City, were the highest-ranked dignitaries who spoke.

Neville thanked AFP and its members for “giving us the support we need to argue on behalf of the individual citizen and not just for more government programs and more regulations and all the other bad stuff, and we can actually advocate on behalf of you, for private citizens.”

Grantham said after his address that he appreciated the AFP members for being at the Capitol to learn how to be “advocates for policies that affect us on a daily basis.”


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Joey BunchJoey BunchJanuary 19, 20184min646
A bill to restore the funding and redistribute the attention of the Colorado Energy Office cleared its first committee Thursday. That’s not surprising for a Republican bill in a Republican-led committee, but the bipartisan 9-2 vote on Senate Bill 3 means it might have a chance to rescue an imperiled agency. Last year a partisan […]

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