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Rachael WrightRachael WrightMarch 9, 201711min14

… Thirty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … According to Don Barbarick, state meteorologist with the Colorado Department of Health’s air pollution division, the Town of Parker was a relative “fail-safe area” for Denver’s “brown cloud," the notorious billow of air pollution that settled across Denver's skyline. Parker was deemed safe because of its elevation, the general direction of winds, and because the brown cloud tended to veer towards the foothills west of Parker, according to experts. “It’s an entire metro-area problem,” said Charles Stevens, a physical scientist with the Environmental Protection Agency. “It’s not just Denver. You guys say, ‘I’ll move out and get away from it’ and pretty soon there are 10,000, 20,000, 30,000 people who move out to the same area and then you’ve got your own brown cloud.”


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightFebruary 9, 201712min338

…Thirty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … Ahhh, those were the days before the long arm of Amendment 41 arrived on the scene — a little heard of show was in town: Legislators on Ice, er, at least on the snow ... all funded by lobbyists who just wanted to make sure their favorite lawmakers were getting in some time for much needed recreation. Three dozen Colorado lawmakers participated in an annual legislative outing sponsored by Colorado Ski Country USA and the Colorado Association of Ski Towns, where they were treated to two days of skiing at Purgatory Ski Resort outside of Durango. Much like one of those time share schemes, the legislators, of course, also took part in informative sessions conducted each morning by the tour sponsors. During these sessions, CSCUSA and CAST took the opportunity to lobby their pet concerns. But first, the butter: “The ski industry,” said CSCUSA President John Lay, “is the single largest employer on the Western Slope, with a total employment of 44,500 in 1985, which in two years had risen eight percent.”


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightJanuary 26, 201712min288

… Twenty Years Ago This Week in The Colorado Statesman … Take that President Bill Clinton! With Chuck Berry presiding as Speaker of the Colorado House, the Republican majority House State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee amended and then proceeded to methodically pass a contentious anti-abortion bill sponsored by state Rep. Barry Arrington, R-Arvada, to ban what he — backed by Christian conservatives who praised Arrington for the measure — called "partialbirth abortions." HB 97-1136, passed after an extensive cross examination by Arrington of Dr. Warren Hern, director of the Boulder Abortion Clinic. The bill made it a misdemeanor, punishable with jail time, for a physician to abort a fetus during a partial birth abortion.


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Rachael WrightRachael WrightDecember 22, 201613min340

Thirty Years Ago This Week in the Colorado Statesman … A former state legislator was bestowed the honor of an ambassadorship. Former state Sen. Sam H. Zakhem was appointed by President Ronald Reagan as Ambassador to the Kingdom of Bahrain, he succeeded Donald Leidel. A well-known name in Colorado politics, Zakhem is Lebanese by birth, was educated in the United States and served Southwest Denver in both the Colorado House and Senate. From 1967 to 1972, Zakhem was an instructor at the University of Colorado extension and was also a foreign student adviser at the University of Denver from 1972 to 1973. Zakhem served as a state representative from 1975-1979, and as a state senator from 1979-1983. While serving in the Colorado Legislature, Zakhem sponsored pioneering efforts dealing with solar energy, aid to the elderly and tougher penalties for drunk drivers and employers who hire illegal aliens. He then, thanks to Reagan's appointment, went on to serve as the U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain from 1986 to 1989.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningSeptember 15, 201613min282

Ten Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman … Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper was joined by Lakewood Mayor Steve Burkholder, Fort Collins Mayor Doug Hutchinson, Colorado Forum director Gail Klapper, former Colorado State University president Al Yates and others to unveil the Colorado Climate Project, aimed at developing a plan to reduce the state’s contribution and vulnerability to a climate disrupted by human activities.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningMarch 24, 201610min318

Twenty Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman … Gov. Roy Romer wielded his veto pen “with open hands urging reconciliation and respect,” rejecting a bill that would have outlawed same-sex marriages in Colorado. Romer said he spent many hours studying the question and, despite an intense campaign waged by supporters and opponents, wound up about where he had started before the bill landed on his desk. The legislation, sponsored by state Rep. Marilyn Musgrave, R-Fort Morgan, and state Sen. Ben Alexander, R-Montrose, “was ...



Ken GordonDecember 30, 20131min179
Editor’s Note: The following column was written by former Senate Majority Leader Ken Gordon on May 21, 2009. Today Andrew Romanoff, Herzl Melmed and I received awards from the Jewish Community Relations Council. Herzl, a doctor, lived in Israel during the Six Day and Yom Kippur Wars and cared for casualties. He has an enormous […]

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