Jonathan Singer Archives - Colorado Politics
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John TomasicJohn TomasicApril 20, 20177min1910

State House Democrats joined Republicans late Wednesday night to vote down a bill that has made waves in various versions the last three years for championing the civil rights of the state’s homeless population. After nearly six hours of emotional testimony, the “Right to Rest Act,” <a href="http://leg.colorado.gov/bills/HB17-1314">House Bill 1314</a>, sponsored by state Democratic Reps. Joe Salazar from Thornton and Jovan Melton from Aurora, fell short in the House Local Government committee. The 8-5 vote came around midnight, Democrats Paul Rosenthal from Denver and Matt Gray from Broomfield joining Republicans in opposition.


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John TomasicJohn TomasicApril 12, 201714min99

It was another weekend in the first months of the Trump administration and so another weekend of packed political town halls in heavily Democratic Boulder County, Colorado. But to what degree is Boulder a bellwether for state and national Democratic Party strategy? U.S. Rep. Jared Polis, a fairly well-known progressive on the national stage, did a lightning tour of towns in his 2nd Congressional District, several of them in Boulder County. His office estimated that nearly 2,000 people showed up — 900 at an event in Boulder; 550 in Loveland; 300 in Nederland; and about 100 in Lyons. There are only 1,400 residents of Nederland. There are only 2,000 residents of Lyons.


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Brian HeubergerBrian HeubergerMarch 31, 20176min1400

A bill that enables doctors to prescribe medical marijuana to PTSD patients has gained momentum in the Legislature this year, passing the Senate with broad support on a 34-1 vote and now pressing forward with similar agreement in the House. Sponsored by state Sen. Irene Aguilar, D-Denver, and state Rep. Jonathan Singer, D-Boulder, SB 17 would add PTSD to the list of conditions that qualify for medical marijuana in Colorado, permitting patients diagnosed with PTSD to treat their symptoms. Colorado would join more than 20 states — plus Washington, D.C., and two U.S. territories — which permit medical marijuana use to treat PTSD.


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John TomasicJohn TomasicMarch 13, 201710min1070

This week we take up where the thud-like introduction of the transportation-funding <a href="https://leg.colorado.gov/bills/hb17-1242" target="_blank">House Bill 1242</a> left off. Conservatives remain unimpressed. Sponsors, House Speaker Crisanta Duran, a Denver Democrat, and Senate President Kevin Gratham, Canon City Republican, will work to make their trial balloon seem less like the Hindenburg, to <a href="https://www.coloradostatesman.com/republicans-conservative-groups-rip-proposal-send-transportation-tax-hike-voters/" target="_blank">borrow a phrase</a> from Littleton Republican Sen. Tim Neville. Supporters of the bill have eight weeks to win over the building. Here’s a GOP source hoping for the best but fearing the worst: “Maybe it’s term limits, but they say deals used to be arrived at in this building through the process of moving a bill through the chambers. Now it’s about backroom handshakes that lead to a bill and, basically, the dealmaking is done. People are lined up for or against. It either passes or fails.” Here’s some of what else is happening this week. As always, the schedule is subject to change.


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John TomasicJohn TomasicMarch 6, 20179min951

Happy halfway mark. On Wednesday, lawmakers will arrive at this year’s legislative session midpoint. Many of the House and Senate minority party bills doomed to die in committee have lived their brief and sometimes newsmaking lives. Now many of the bills doomed to die at the hands of the opposite chamber majority party will meet their own swift ends. Then soon will appear this year’s “long bill” budget proposal. And then, on the long bill’s tale, will come the big compromise proposal on transportation funding… and anything else lawmakers feel pressure or overdue obligation or last gasp whimsy to move on at last. Note as ever that almost everything about the legislative schedule is subject to change, at almost any time.