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Marianne GoodlandNovember 15, 20178min239
The 2017-18 spending spree that Colorado lawmakers and the governor went on, courtesy of a $56.5 million boost in marijuana tax revenues, won’t be repeated in 2018-19, according to an analysis of those revenues presented this week to the Joint Budget Committee. That led some JBC members to warn fellow lawmakers and the governor that […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchSeptember 11, 20177min156
House Republican Leader Patrick Neville says if voters put Republicans in charge of the legislature and the governor’s office next year, you can expect big changes on how the bills get paid in Colorado. The state budget, $28.5 billion, is the most important thing the legislature does. It pays for everything from schools to prisons, […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchAugust 30, 20174min810

Pat Steadman, the former state senator and public citizen extraordinaire, was honored with a lifetime achievement award last weekend at One Colorado Education Fund’s annual Ally Awards, which honors those who have worked for the rights and good of LGBTQ Coloradans and their families were:

Term limits kept Steadman from running again last year. He’s the CEO of Behavioral Healthcare in Denver, but his resume reads like scroll of achievements on behalf of Coloradans.

An influential member of the General Assembly respected by both parties, Steadman was a member of the Joint Budget Committee. But before he was done, he helped rewrite the state’s liquor laws to eventually allow beer and wine in more grocery stores while helping protect and compensate liquor stores already in business nearby when the laws changed.

In 2013, after two years of trying, Steadman led the charge to pass legislation authorizing civil unions for same-sex couples.

He was honored by President Obama at the White House that year when he was presented the Harvey Milk Champion of Change Award.

He earned his bonafides in public policy more than two decades ago fighting to overturn Colorado’s Amendment 2, the citizen-passed constitutional amendment that banned state and local laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.

Another One Colorado honoree Saturday night worked alongside Steadman in that fight.

Jean Dubofsky, the first woman to serve on the Colorado Supreme Court in 1979 before returning to private practice, was then lead attorney in the Romer v. Evans case that led the high court to toss out Amendment 2.

The case happened at a pivotal time, she told Sarah Kuta of the Boulder Daily Camera last year.

“All of a sudden people just started understanding that, ‘Oh yeah, this is not a mortal danger, this is not a threat, these are the people who’ve already been around me all the time,'” Dubofsky recalled. “That’s the reason I think all of the change since Romer v. Evans moved so fast. I had no idea that things would move that quickly, but it’s really, to my way of thinking, just been terrific.”

One Colorado also honored Kaiser Permanente for being a health care industry leader in removing insurance plan exclusions for transgender people, as well as improving experiences for LGBTQ patients.

The civil rights law firm Rathod Mohamedbhai was honored for working on the relationship between the Muslim and LGBTQ communities, as well as representing Jessie Hernandez, the lesbian teen shot by Denver police as she fled in a stolen car in 2015.


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Joey BunchJoey BunchAugust 25, 20173min1240

The recently retired principal of Will Rogers Elementary School has a new assignment: running for the state legislature.

Terry Martinez tells Colorado Politics is seeking the District 18 seat in Colorado Springs that will be vacated by Rep. Pete Lee, a Democrat who is term-limited.

The District 18 race includes fellow Democrat Graham Anderson and Republicans Jillian Likness and Donald Howbert, according to the Secretary of State’s Office.

Lee was first elected to the House in 2010 and was re-elected to his final term last November with 53 percent over Republican Cameron Forth and Libertarian Norman Dawson.

“It would be an honor to serve the people of Colorado Springs and Manitou Springs in the state House” Martinez said in a statement. “We need leaders in the legislature with the passion and experience to help our communities overcome challenges and seek out new opportunities.

“My career as a teacher, principal and community leader allowed me to work with people to create real results, and I want to bring that skill to the state House of Representatives.”

A lifelong resident of Colorado Springs, Martinez’s education career includes Will Rogers and West Side schools. He ran the Valley Swim Team for many years, as well has his community involvement through New Life Downtown church.

His campaign provided an endorsement from a legislator who knows the legislative value of a background in education.

“Terry Martinez is the right choice for El Paso County,” state Rep. Millie Hamner, D-Dillon, a former school superintendent who sits on the legislature’s Joint Budget Committee.

“We need more representatives with the skills Terry has developed through his years as a teacher and principal to fight for educational opportunities for Colorado’s youth and to bring thoughtful leadership experience to the state House. I am proud to endorse his candidacy.”

Martinez lives in Colorado Springs with his wife, Jennifer, and has three adult daughters.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningJune 26, 20178min92

A group of liberal advocacy organizations for the first time released combined legislative scorecards this week, conglomerating assessments of the 100 Colorado lawmakers’ votes last session on key legislation the organizations said they plan to present to voters next year. A Republican who received among the lowest overall scores, however, dismissed the endeavor as a “political stunt” and told Colorado Politics he doubts the predictable rankings — Democrats good, Republicans bad — give voters any meaningful information.