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Joey BunchJoey BunchJanuary 22, 20182min275
The Colorado Heart Gallery puts a face, or a few, on foster care adoption this month in Fort Collins, exhibiting photographs of kids hoping to be adopted. Last year in Colorado 874 such foster kids found permanent homes, the Department of Human Services said. As of a couple of weeks ago, 267 others were awaiting adoption, […]

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Joey BunchJoey BunchJanuary 12, 20183min1735

Democrat Barrett Rothe jumped in the state House District 43 race this week to unseat Republican incumbent Kevin Van Winkle in the Highlands Ranch district.

Rothe is a healthcare industry consultant who is unopposed, so far, in the Democratic primary. Unity Party candidate Scott Wagner also is in the race. Wagner ran as a Democrat last year and got 39.4 percent against Van Winkle, the highest total for a Democrat since Van Winkle was elected to his first two-year term in 2014.

Rothe ran as an unaffiliated candidate for the state Senate District 14 seat in Fort Collins in 2012, a race won by current incumbent John Kefalas, a Democrat.

“I’m excited for the opportunity to connect with voters over the next year,” Rothe said in a statement. “The people in Highlands Ranch deserve a thoughtful debate and a representative that will work for families and small-businesses, not the fringe groups that control their politicians today.”

Rothe called the March 6 caucuses his first test.

“We’re going to work hard to get people to the caucuses,” he said, “Democrats and Republicans are frustrated across the country, none more so than Colorado, and we want everyone in our district to take their frustrations to the caucuses in March, the primaries in June, and then the ballot in November.”

He noted that unaffiliated voters, the stage’s largest bloc, will be allowed to cast ballots in the June primary for the first time, and that favors moderate candidates.

“Both parties would be wise to rethink their strategies in our state,” he stated. “House District 43 in particular is ground zero for frustrated, moderate voters getting hit hardest by the anti-middle class policies coming from Washington, D.C. It’s going to be a year worth watching the seats taken for granted by Republicans.”

Rothe has an undergraduate degree from the University of Northern Colorado and a master’s in public administration from the University of Colorado Denver. He and his wife, Annelise, own a floral company in Highlands Ranch.

He also has a great website.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningDecember 18, 20178min616

There are a few things that define Lew Gaiter III, the Larimer County commissioner running in the Republican primary for governor. He’s a Christian and a cancer survivor. He’s a family man who built a business. After growing up in a family of prominent Colorado Democrats, he’s been a Republican since his college years. Until a couple of weeks ago, he was president of Colorado Counties Inc., and he only recently went off a national board of county commissioners.


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Joey BunchJoey BunchAugust 9, 20173min487
Two pieces of legislation that became law Wednesday will help protect the rights of Colorado renters and mobile home residents. Hundreds of other laws take effect on the 90th day since the end of the legislative session. Senate Bill 245 requires landlords to give 21 days’ notice before raising the rent, instead of seven under […]

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John TomasicJohn TomasicMay 10, 20175min722

The Colorado Open Records Act this year will receive a long-overdue digital-era update after <a href="http://leg.colorado.gov/bills/sb17-040" target="_blank">Senate Bill 40</a> on Wednesday ended its switchback journey over the entire course of the 120-day legislative session Wednesday, finishing in the Senate with an against-all-odds unanimous vote of support. “No one would have guessed it would receive all 35 votes in the Senate,” said sponsor Sen. John Kefalas, a Democrat from Fort Collins. “I think the bill does move the dial forward in meaningful ways and brings up the window just a tad in granting greater access to records that belong to the people.


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John TomasicJohn TomasicApril 26, 20174min340

State Sen. John Kafalas, the diminutive Democrat from Fort Collins, drew a word-picture of himself climbing onto a Harley Davidson. “I know it’s hard t believe, but I’ve ridden Harleys, and as long as they’re low riders, I can touch the ground and hold the bike up,” he said, drawing howls from the chamber. “Back in the 1980s, I actually did an ‘Easy Rider’ kind of adventure, I rode from Colorado to New York on a 380 Kawasaki,” Kefalas continued. “I would not recommend taking a 380 Kawasaki across the country.”