Jeff Wasden Archives - Colorado Politics
Trump-Immigration_Prat-1-1280x922.jpg

Joey BunchJoey BunchDecember 7, 20173min1650

Metropolitan State University of Denver is putting on a roundtable Thursday for Colorado business and community leaders to talk about the economic benefit of immigrants covered by DACA.

The discussion is part of a broader national campaign to urge Congress to reinstate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, passed by President Obama to shielded people brought to this country as children from deportation.

President Trump signed an executive order ending the program, but activists, Democrats and even otherwise conservative business leaders are urging Congress to reinstate the so-called Dream Act.

The program allowed an estimated 690,000 immigrants brought to this country as children to receive two-year renewal work permits, including about 17,000 in Colorado.

The iMarch, as it’s called, is in Room 440A3 of the Student Success Building at Metro State on the Auraria Campus in Denver.

The iMarch for Immigration Campaign is a national day of local events in all 50 states, organizers said.

iMarch will highlight the voices of leaders in the business, agriculture, education, tech, and faith sectors, and the support of state and local elected officials.

The Denver speakers are slated to be:

  • Jeff Wasden, president of the Colorado Business Roundtable
  • Janine Davidson, president of Metro State University
  • Chad Vorthman, executive vice president of the Colorado Farm Bureau

The event is supported by the New American Economy, the Colorado Business Roundtable and Voto Latino.

Colorado Politics has told you about the work of the New American Economy before. The national coalition of more than 500 Republican, Democratic and independent mayors and business leaders is urging Congress to act on comprehensive immigration reform for the sake of the economy.

“Coalition members include mayors of more than 35 million people nationwide and business leaders of companies that generate more than $1.5 trillion and employ more than 4 million people across all sectors of the economy, from agriculture to aerospace, hospitality to high tech and media to manufacturing,” the organization said in a statement.

The Colorado Business Roundtable advocates for business-supportive legislation in the state and across the West, working with industries, chambers of commerce, educational institutions and government leaders.

“Our goal is to improve the business environment, increase effectiveness and expand the reach of our partners,” the organization states.


write-mail-square-flat-multi-colored-icons-vector-id865765012-2.jpg

Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirNovember 9, 20178min2230

The U.S. House of Representatives passed the Senate budget recently, paving the way for tax reform. Markups have begun in House Ways and Means and changes are already being made to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. While the passage of the budget was a significant step forward in advancing President Trump’s top legislative priority, there are some clear warning signs for businesses anxious to see meaningful tax reform.


unnamed-1-1280x826.jpg

Joey BunchJoey BunchNovember 8, 20173min253
Colorado business groups are asking Congress to delay reinstating a tax on insurers, which could be passed on to small businesses in higher insurance costs. Colorado Politics told you Friday about the Health Insurance Tax that business groups and insurance companies hoped would perish from the Affordable Care Act this year. The Obamacare assessment on […]

This content is only available to subscribers.

Login or Subscribe


Jeff-Headshot-e1505874963599-1280x1280.jpg

Jeff WasdenJeff WasdenOctober 10, 20176min4440

With the Senate looking toward what’s next on health care reform and open enrollment looming, one issue picking up bipartisan support is delaying the health insurance tax for 2018. Delaying the tax would be an immediate action Congress could take to lower premiums.  In fact, if a delay of this tax is passed soon, individuals, employers and seniors could see premiums lowered by as much 3 percent next year.



Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirSeptember 20, 20176min3020
Jeff Wasden

President Trump visited Springfield, Missouri and laid out his plans for reforming our nation’s outdated, complex and uncompetitive tax system. The president’s plan is built around an America-first tax system that is focused on jobs, increasing wages and wealth in America, and restoring the American dream.

The Business Roundtable conducted a survey of their CEOs and 90 percent responded that delaying tax reform will harm the U.S. economy by causing slower economic growth, hiring, and capital investment. Fifty-seven percent of the responding CEOs say delaying tax reform means their company will delay capital spending, the investment that drives jobs and growth. Fifty-six percent say their companies will delay hiring plans.

President Trump believes lower taxes and higher wages will result in a better life for all Americans and make the American dream more accessible than ever before. The Colorado Business Roundtable enthusiastically endorses a tax-reform plan that: simplifies our tax code in a way that is fair to all Americans; leads to job creation and higher wages; provides tax relief for the working and middle class, and paves the way for repatriation of funds parked off-shore back to the United States.

Our current tax code has increased in length and complexity so that 94 percent of U.S. taxpayers needed some form of help to file their returns, according to National Taxpayers Union, and 91 percent of small businesses hired a professional to do their taxes, according to the National Federation of Independent Business. Taxpayers spend over 6 billion hours annually complying with the tax code, according to the IRS’s Taxpayer Advocate Service. Complying with current tax code — which is six times longer today than it was in 1955 — places a $262 billion burden on the economy.

Colorado’s economy depends on 892 U.S. companies that actively operate internationally, competing in global markets on a daily basis for inputs, capital and customers. These globally engaged companies directly and indirectly contributed $148.8 billion to the Colorado economy in 2013, according to a Business Roundtable report. Focusing on tax reforms that benefit Colorado workers; that are simple and fair; that set a competitive rate that drives job creation and higher wages, is something every Coloradan should champion.

“If we don’t have tax reform sometime this or early next year, a lot of the business investment that’s been predicated on getting tax reform done will have been poorly made,” said J.D. Foster, senior vice president and chief economist at the U.S. Chamber. “Business investment will likely contract significantly, and we will have a significant period of economic weakness in my opinion.”

Our economy is healthy when we grow at roughly 3.5 percent. Since 2007, it has been below 2.5 percent consistently. Significant and generational tax reform is at the core of President Trump’s plan to return to over 3 percent growth. A 3 percent growth rate will yield a nominal gross domestic product that is $16 trillion larger, generate $2.9 trillion in federal government revenue, and raise wages and salaries of American workers by $7 trillion, according to administration estimates.

Fixing our broken tax code for families, small businesses, workers and job creators is the single most important action we can take to grow our economy and help the middle class get ahead. If we are successful in this once-in-a-generation opportunity to make taxes simpler, fairer and lower for hard-working Colorado families, we can encourage entrepreneurs to reinvest in their businesses and American companies to bring back jobs and profits trapped overseas.

“CEOs overwhelmingly believe that tax reform is the most effective way to put more Americans to work in a stronger, growing economy. The Trump administration’s recent release of its tax proposals was a significant step forward as they work with Congress on pro-growth reform legislation. By demonstrating the importance of tax reform to business and the U.S. economy, these survey results confirm that tax reform is a critical priority if we are to grow the economy and create jobs and opportunity,” said Business Roundtable President and CEO Joshua Bolten.

Colorado Business Roundtable strongly encourages our congressional delegation, leadership, and the administration to pass meaningful and permanent tax reform. If you are interested in joining business leaders, chambers and associations in advocating for a fairer, simpler and more competitive rate, please contact us at jwasden@cobrt.com


Peaches-3-W-T.jpg

Ernest LuningErnest LuningJuly 21, 201721min114

Despite concerns earlier this year that the new Trump administration’s hardline immigration policies would lead to labor shortages across Colorado’s agricultural sector, growers and their advocates are breathing a sigh of relief as the harvest approaches, confident they’ll have the hands to pick and package what could be a bumper crop. But even though one component of the country’s sprawling immigration system appears to be working as it has been this summer, industry experts and a newly formed state coalition of business and civic leaders say that doesn’t mean the entire system is any less broken.


Wadhams-Wadhams-T.jpg

Ernest LuningErnest LuningApril 6, 201723min165

Dick Wadhams, who chaired the state Republican Party for two terms and had a hand in electing the statewide officials who set the tone for the Colorado GOP across three decades, has a message for the party: Republicans have never had it easy in Colorado. “This has always been a competitive state; this has never been a Republican bastion,” he told the monthly meeting of the Highlands Ranch Republicans early last Friday morning.


HRGOP-Hays-Wasden-Athanasopoulos-McCarney.jpg

Ernest LuningErnest LuningMarch 2, 201719min1100

It was all elbows and Spartacus at a spirited forum featuring the candidates for state GOP chairman last Friday at a meeting of the Highlands Ranch Republicans. Former congressional candidate George Athanasopoulos, former El Paso County Republican Party Chairman Jeff Hays and Grand Junction activist Kevin McCarney, who chaired Donald Trump’s presidential campaign in Mesa County, introduced themselves and then took questions for nearly an hour at the GOP group’s monthly breakfast at Salsa Brava restaurant in Highlands Ranch.