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Colorado PoliticsColorado PoliticsMay 10, 20189min505

The recent opinion piece from Colorado teacher Jill Cullis shed some light on the problems facing Colorado’s schools. Recent increases in funding, with the bulk of those dollars not going to teachers' salaries, is the real problem. During Teacher Appreciation Week, we should highlight the fact that outstanding teachers are making the same salaries as mediocre or even underperforming teachers. In fact, based on outdated salary schedules used in most school districts, many underperforming teachers will make more than their “highly effective” counterparts.  This is an incredible disservice to Colorado educators and students.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirMarch 14, 20183min909

Denver Public Schools may have decided to trade weapons for plowshares — it announced last week it would turn down National Rifle Association grants for assorted school programs in the wake of the Parkland, Florida school massacre — but the Second Amendment-friendly, Denver-based Independence Institute is sticking to its guns.

As the Associated Press reported over the weekend:

The libertarian-leaning Independence Institute is one of the top recipients of charitable NRA grants, according to an Associated Press analysis of the NRA Foundation’s public tax records. The think tank received $241,000 from the foundation in 2016, the last year for which data is available. The institute reported receiving a total of $2 million in grants and donations that year.

The size of the Independence Institute’s grant is large enough to make Colorado the state with the fourth largest amount of NRA charitable donations, with $293,000 in grants. That places it only behind two much larger states — California and Texas — and North Carolina, home to Speedway Children’s Charities, which has received the largest NRA donation at $425,000.

The NRA wouldn’t comment for the AP, but the wire service’s findings hardly come as a shocker. As the AP’s Nicholas Riccardi notes in the report:

The Independence Institute has a long history in Colorado politics and is a prominent advocate of gun rights positions. Its research director, Dave Kopel, has written numerous law review articles defending gun rights and filed friend of court briefs supporting firearms owners and groups.

The think tank’s public affairs chief, Mike Krause, seemed downright proud, telling the AP: “It would make sense that America’s oldest civil rights organization, the NRA, would support our work … Indeed, we would like to think we are the most vocal and principled defender of the Second Amendment, and of the human right of self-defense, in Colorado. ”


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Marianne GoodlandMarianne GoodlandMarch 13, 20189min1940

The Trump administration is OK with a ban on bump stocks. The Florida Legislature, despite opposition from the National Rifle Association, last week approved a package of gun control measures, including a ban on bump stocks that increase the firing capacity of normal rifles. Colorado's state Senate is a week away from hearing a bill that would take the same step. But it won't pass here, according to Senate Republican leadership. And they're backed by several gun rights groups that all oppose bump stock bans and which have been generous with Senate Republicans.


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Ernest LuningErnest LuningFebruary 27, 20184min4684

The conservative Washington Free Beacon on Monday pointed out that Democratic congressional candidate Jason Crow works at a high-powered law firm that has lobbied and done legal work for gun interests at the same time he's attacked the "gun lobby" and been calling on U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman to return campaign contributions from the National Rifle Association.