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Ernest LuningErnest LuningMay 25, 201727min751

By one measure, state Rep. Justin Everett, a House Republican serving his third term in the Colorado General Assembly, and state Reps. Chris Hansen and Chris Kennedy, a pair of Democrats in their first terms, stand as far apart as any lawmakers at the Capitol, based on the votes they cast in the just-completed 2017 regular session. Considering all the bills that made it to final, third-reading votes in the session — 490 in the House and 459 in the Senate — between them, these three legislators cast the most ‘no’ votes and the most ‘yes’ votes, respectively, according to an analysis prepared by bill-tracking service Colorado Capitol Watch.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinJanuary 25, 201711min384

Voters in rural areas of Colorado would continue to be able to approve a property tax of up to five mills to fund mass transit systems in their local communities through 2029, under a bill approved by the House Transportation and Energy Committee Wednesday, Jan.25. House Bill 17-1018 extends the statutory authority of regional transportation authorities (RTAs) to ask local voters to approve such a tax within a specified area to be served by mass transit. Under current law, RTAs can seek voter approval to levy a property tax until Jan. 1, 2019.