CU-party-1-1024x694.jpg

Rachael WrightRachael WrightFebruary 16, 201711min303

… Twenty Years Ago This Week in The Colorado Statesman … An El Paso County Republican saga continued with self-proclaimed “true conservatives” toppling the “old guard,” seizing the reins of El Paso's Grand Old Party. After staking their campaigns on pro-life and Christian values, they went on to capture the top three party offices and 20 bonus member slots to the state GOP Central Committee. Many contended the social conservative sweep down south marked the end of the “big tent” era when party leadership preached tolerance for those with differing social views, particularly on the topic of abortion. The winners? Colorado Springs attorney Wayne Williams was elected chairman of the El Paso County Republican Party, Focus on the Family executive Tom Minnery won vice chairman and Leigh Ann Rauch was chosen secretary. All three were given a stamp of approval by a coalition of “true conservative” Republicans.


CO-Prison-170117-e1484709437712-1024x609.jpg

Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinJanuary 17, 201710min593

It costs the Colorado Department of Corrections $57,000 to treat each of 32 inmates infected with Hepatitis C with expensive new drugs that have had a 100 percent success rate. That cost did not sit well with members of the Colorado House and Senate Judiciary committees when the Joint Budget Committee presented the figures during a Tuesday, Jan. 17, Joint Rule 25 hearing. Such hearings are held to keep committees informed of agency and department developments and funding requests within their jurisdiction.


MarioTeaser_5.jpg

Mario NicolaisMario NicolaisJanuary 4, 20176min375

For the Colorado Legislature, the new year means new bills and new issues to tackle under the gold dome. In one of the legislative chambers, the state Senate, this new season in state politics will also mean plenty of new faces as well. Even before the session convenes on Jan. 11, the judiciary committees will begin their work. Joint judiciary meetings will be held on Jan. 3 and 4. Members will discuss upcoming bills and issues to be addressed. It is effectively a head start on a session that always seems both too long and too short. Too long for those involved in the daily rough and tumble; too short to address many of the state’s pressing issues.


AP16298723948483-2-e1477820623770.jpg

Tom RamstackTom RamstackNovember 4, 201613min324

Popular opinion surveys show Colorado is likely to be propelled into an uncertain area of law next week when voters decide whether to allow doctor-assisted suicides for terminally ill persons. Sixty-five percent of Denver-area registered voters surveyed in a Ciruli Associates poll in September said they would vote for the legalized suicides. Twenty-five percent opposed it. If Proposition 106 wins approval, Colorado would become the fifth state to allow doctor-assisted suicide. Patients with less than six months to live could request lethal drugs from their doctors under the measure.


AP19945804034-e1474648629353.jpg

Jared WrightJared WrightSeptember 23, 20163min312

Hillary Clinton's former chief of staff, Cheryl Mills, and two other staff members were granted immunity deals in exchange for their cooperation in the now-closed FBI investigation into Clinton's use of a private email server as secretary of state, says a Republican congressman. Rep. Jason Chaffetz, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, told the Associated Press on Friday that Mills gave federal investigators access to her laptop on the condition that findings couldn't be used against her.


AP16265522219708-e1474469891769.jpg

Alan FramAlan FramSeptember 21, 20168min253

IRS Commissioner John Koskinen expressed regret to Congress Wednesday for his agency's past mistreatment of tea party groups, but said he has cooperated with congressional investigators and does not deserve to be impeached. The IRS chief made the remarks at a House Judiciary Committee hearing during a continued push by some conservatives to oust Koskinen. Their impeachment resolution accuses him of lying to lawmakers, ignoring subpoenas and overseeing an agency that destroyed emails as Congress investigated how the IRS subjected tea party groups seeking tax exemptions to harsh investigations years ago.


RonPaulMug.jpg

Ron PaulRon PaulJune 2, 20166min321

Three recent stories regarding three government agencies — the IRS, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) — show why we should oppose big government for practical, as well as philosophical, reasons. In recent months, many Americans have missed their flights because of longer-than-usual TSA security lines. In typical D.C. fashion, the TSA claims the delays are because of budget cuts, even though Congress regularly increases the TSA's funding! The TSA is also blaming the delays on the fact that few Americans have signed up for its "PreCheck" program. Under PreCheck, the TSA considers excusing some Americans from some of the screening process. Those who wish to be considered must first submit personal information to the TSA and pay a fee. Only a bureaucrat would think Americans would be eager to give the TSA more information and money on the chance that they may be approved for PreCheck.