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Colorado PoliticsColorado PoliticsAugust 14, 20185min2038

Let’s fix our roads without a massive 21 percent increase of our state sales tax. The collaborative cronyists' proposal, "Let's Go Colorado" — a huge tax increase, allegedly for transportation — hurts everyday, hardworking Coloradans who are chasing their American dream.  If the politicians, bureaucrats, governmental appointees and interested parties behind the proposal, get their way, we’ll pay an additional 21 percent in state sales tax on basic items that make our lives better such as diapers, toilet paper and school supplies.


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Walker StapletonWalker StapletonJune 7, 20186min1548

Colorado’s roads and bridges have fallen into disrepair. The state’s growing population, history of underfunding transportation, and bureaucratic inefficiency have had real consequences for the condition of our infrastructure. As a result, Colorado has a $9 billion funding gap and maintenance backlog. These costs will only continue to grow the longer we neglect our transportation needs.


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Donna LynneDonna LynneJune 7, 20185min576

Whether it is driving across failing bridges, battling congestion on your way to work or footing the bill for repairs to your car caused by potholes, I know you have a transportation horror story. You aren’t alone. With nearly half of Colorado’s major roads and highways in poor or mediocre condition, these stories are the rule, not the exception. More than $9 billion in needed state transportation projects have been identified with no funding in sight.


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Miller HudsonMiller HudsonMay 30, 20185min966

There were several flashes of bipartisan compromise at the close of the legislative session that provide a glimmer of hope for the emergence of a Colorado First political majority. It’s not a sure thing by a long shot, but it feels like our major political parties are starting to respond to pressure from voters who are enlisting in the “Lets get something done, even if we have to pay for it…” caucus. The legislature’s eleventh-hour approval last year for a reclassification of the hospital provider fee, exempting these revenues from TABOR spending restrictions, proved a harbinger for what transpired this year. During the closing hours of the 2018 session transportation funding, phase 2 of a PERA bailout, redistricting reform and more were pushed across the finish line.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirMay 3, 20187min962

In 2012 the Colorado Transportation Commission passed Policy Directive 1603, which directed the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) to “strongly consider managed lanes during the planning process for new capacity projects (any expansion and/or operational improvements) on state highways that are or will be congested.” In addition, the directive stated that CDOT must justify “the decision to not include managed lanes.”