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Miller HudsonMiller HudsonOctober 22, 20187min492

The passing of Bill Coors reminds me that the challenge of providing affordable access to health care across Colorado has produced a recurring history of failed reforms. For nearly 40 years voters have reported the cost of medical insurance as their number one, two or three policy concern, depending on what else was jarring the state’s economy at the time. This conundrum has advanced to the front of the governor’s race as Jared Polis promises to search for a way to cover every Coloradan and Walker Stapleton protests we can’t afford universal health care. At the core of this policy dilemma is a failure to reach consensus on whether health care should be treated as a public or private good.


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Tim PetersMarch 19, 201811min508

Two bills have been introduced in this year’s state legislative session to promote reforms to medical facilities known as freestanding emergency departments (FSED) in Colorado. These proposals, proponents claim, would dramatically improve price transparency and ensure that patients have the information they need to understand what type of facility they are at and that the costs of receiving care at such a facility may be higher than other facilities.


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Kevin LundbergKevin LundbergJanuary 15, 20186min847

Last year I sponsored Senate Bill 17-065, which the governor signed into law in April. It requires hospitals, doctors offices and other medical clinics to publicly post their most common charges for medical services. It is not intended to be a burdensome requirement, as there is a limited number of services to be listed. The purpose is to give citizens a better idea of what medical procedures cost before they get the treatment or the bill, and to start that much-needed conversation concerning the cost of medical services between a doctor and their patient.


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Dan NjegomirDan NjegomirNovember 16, 20174min568

On behalf of the Colorado Nonprofit Association, I want to share that the Colorado Nonprofit Association board of directors has officially stated its opposition to the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act (H.R. 1) now pending in Congress. Our board’s official statement can be found here: https://www.coloradononprofits.org/news/colorado-nonprofit-association-opposes-house-tax-cuts-and-jobs-act/nov-13-2017