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Adam McCoyAdam McCoyNovember 16, 20172min465

Denver International Airport will grow to address surging passenger traffic after city officials approved a $1.5 billion gate-expansion project earlier this week.

The Denver City Council OK’d a series of design and construction contracts associated with the project Monday night. The 39-gate expansion across the airport’s three concourses is expected to be complete by 2021.

“I think people should know that Denver is growing and that means that their airport has to grow at the same time,” DIA spokesperson Heath Montgomery told Denver7.

DIA officials say the airport must expand to meet climbing passenger traffic. When the airport first opened more than two decades ago, it was designed to accommodate 50 million passengers a year. But DIA passenger traffic has perpetually swelled, exceeding airport capacity last year. The airport set a passenger traffic record last year with 58.3 million traveling through its gates last year.

The new gate expansion is akin to another project recently approved by the city. The $1.8 billion Great Hall Project will overhaul security screening checkpoints and concessions and boost the Jeppesen terminal’s capacity to 80 million passengers a year. Through a 34-year, private-public partnership with Spanish transportation infrastructure behemoth Ferrovial, the project was controversial, in part, because of the City Council’s loss of oversight of new concessions.

DIA’s concourses were initially designed to allow for growth and additional gates, according to the airport. In 2014, five new gates were completed on DIA’s C concourse in a $46 million expansion project to bring the airport’s current gate count to 107.


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Adam McCoyAdam McCoyOctober 30, 20173min632

Denver International Airport has outgrown its 107 gates, officials argue.

DIA set passenger traffic records last year – 58.3 million traveled through the airport’s gates last year. To bridge that surging traffic, airport officials have proposed a nearly $1.5 billion project to add 39 gates across DIA’s three concourses, the Denver Business Journal reports.

Denver’s Business, Arts, Workforce and Aeronautical Services Committee is slated to review four five-year contracts Wednesday afternoon. The contracts would cover design and construction of the new passenger gates. If OK’d in committee, the contracts could be considered by the full City Council by mid-November. Airport officials hope to have the gates completed by 2021.

DIA officials argue the airport must expand to meet climbing passenger traffic. Airport leaders had previously noted plans to add anywhere from 26 to 56 new gates, according to the Business Journal.

When the airport first opened more than two decades ago, it was designed to accommodate 50 million passengers a year. But DIA passenger traffic has perpetually swelled, exceeding airport capacity last year.

Denver officials recently approved the $1.8 billion Great Hall Project to overhaul security screening checkpoints and concessions and boost the Jeppesen terminal’s capacity to 80 million passengers a year. Through a 34-year, private-public partnership with Spanish transportation infrastructure behemoth Ferrovial, the project was controversial, in part, because of the City Council’s loss of oversight of new concessions.

On Wednesday, the Denver committee will consider a $700 million contract with joint venture Turner-Flatiron and a $655 million contract with joint venture Holder-FCI for pre-construction and construction management, and two $65 million design and engineering contracts with HNTB Corporation and Jacobs Engineering Group, according to city documents.

DIA’s concourses were initially designed to allow for growth and additional gates, according to the airport. In 2014, five new gates were completed on DIA’s C concourse in a $46 million expansion project.


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Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinNovember 18, 20167min539

Monthly lobbyist financial reports required by the City and County of Denver, designed to help the public know who is lobbying City Council members on what issues, are commonly submitted with no reported expenditures, a review of the documents by the The Colorado Statesman has found. While no wrongdoing or rules violations is thought to have occurred, the city ordinance that regulates lobbyists by requiring registration and the reports does not identify specific oversight. Like many other areas of municipal and state regulations, it is basically a self-reporting arrangement that is only investigated upon complaint, according to Assistant City Attorney David Broadwell.