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Rachael WrightRachael WrightJune 22, 20178min280

Twenty Years Ago This Week in The Colorado Statesman: Little old Colorado was plunged into the deep end of international politics when Denver hosted eight world leaders from the Group of Seven. Denver rolled out the carpet for national leaders from the USA, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Italy, Russia and the United Kingdom, and on the agenda for discussion were a host of heavy-weight issues including


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Clifford D. MayClifford D. MayApril 27, 20179min384

On the grounds of the Turkish Embassy facing Massachusetts Ave. in Washington, D.C. is a statue of Mustafa Kamal Ataturk, father of the Republic of Turkey, the nation-state he built from the rubble of the defeated Ottoman Empire and Islamic caliphate. He is wearing a three-piece suit that would look stylish today but he is steely-eyed in a way that is peculiar to early 20th century revolutionaries. He appears to be gazing into the future — a future in which Turkey would be modern, prosperous, secular and democratic.


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Clifford D. MayClifford D. MayNovember 17, 20169min388

“He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past.” This, as you may recall, was the slogan of the totalitarian state imagined by George Orwell in 1984, his classic novel. Today, various groups of Islamists — which we can define as those committed to Islamic supremacism — are operationalizing this concept, attempting to alter the historical record in support of their totalitarian ambitions. Six months before the attack of 9/11/01, Taliban leader Mullah Omar ordered the destruction of Afghanistan’s ancient Buddhas of Bamiyan. Why? Because those monumental statues were reminders of a time when the country was not Islamic.