085a68db9344a6375e2e2cdb09a2e81b.jpg

Joey BunchJoey BunchOctober 4, 20174min546

U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner had a hard time getting his point across over liberal opponents in a series of town halls this summer, but Friday morning he’ll try again in Pueblo.

The Republican from Yuma announced Wednesday morning he will meet with constituents at the Pueblo Convention Center from 9:30 to 11 a.m. The doors open at 8:30 a.m.

“Constituents are encouraged to arrive early, as space is limited,” Gardner’s office said in a statement.

The Pueblo Convention Center seats about 1,300. The hall is located at 320 Central Main St.

Gardner was grilled on health care and the Trump agenda, in general, during town hall meetings in Durango, Colorado Springs, Greeley, Lakewood and Grand Junction last summer. Those town halls came after Democrats and other opponents staged a series of protests calling for him to hold a town hall meeting to explain his positions.

Gardner has supported failed Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, and he has been a leading voice in the Senate calling for an appropriate response to the nuclear threats posed by North Korea.

Last month in Summit County he spoke about the need for tax reform, the latest item on the GOP’s stalled agenda under President Bush, and to relieve traffic congestion on Interstate 70.

Gardner also is likely to get questions, if not anti-GOP protests, over President Trump’s plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Gardner, who chairs the National Republican Senatorial Committee, however, has supported the Dream Act. He and fellow Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet, a Democrat from Denver, are co-sponsoring legislation to defend young immigrants and provide a path to citizenship under certain conditions.

“Children who came to this country without documentation, through no fault of their own, must have the opportunity to remain here lawfully,” Gardner said in a statement this month.

Pueblo is considered in play, after being a Democratic stronghold for decades. Last year, Pueblo County went for President Trump, the first Republican presidential candidate to win there since Richard Nixon outpolled George McGovern there in 1972.

Gardner lost to incumbent Sen. Mark Udall by less that half a percentage point in Pueblo County in 2014.


gettyimages-5845512901-e1479246132581.jpg

Mike McKibbinMike McKibbinNovember 15, 201612min296

No matter how this year's presidential election turned out, there were going to be about 60 million people in America who felt the winner was "in no manner, shape or form someone who represented them or their values." And the keynote speaker at last week's 27th annual SRI Conference on Sustainable, Responsible, Impact Investing at the Hyatt Regency Downtown Denver also said any angst or anger against the government was misplaced.


WillDurst-1-831x1024.jpg

Will DurstWill DurstJuly 13, 20165min326

A vice presidential pick is a defining moment in a campaign, motivating nominees to utilize unique strategies. Some try to accentuate their heavyweight status by partnering up with less vibrant versions of themselves in what might be called the "Bad Xerox Without Any Toner" maneuver. Think ... Dan Quayle. Some candidates pick opponents who put up distinguished fights on the primary trail, even though the two get along like hot fudge sundaes and gravel rakes in the "One Plus One Equals Three" scenario. Lyndon Johnson and Al Gore fit this template. Others look for anything semi-vertical and warm blooded, in the "Please, Somebody, Anybody, Say Yes" approach which led George McGovern to pick Sargent Shriver after his first choice was revealed to suffer from depression (before being picked, as opposed to Shriver who was afflicted afterwards).


YesteryearDaleTooleyBookW-696x1024.jpg

Ernest LuningErnest LuningFebruary 11, 20168min407
Thirty Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman … I’d Rather Be in Denver — Dale Tooley’s Own Story, reached the top of the local best-seller lists just a few weeks after its release, according to both The Denver Post and the Rocky Mountain News. The former Denver district attorney had completed his autobiography […]

This content is only available to subscribers.

Login or Subscribe